Kendall Lecture Series

The Kendall Lecture Series was established through the philanthropy of Nancy, ’87, and Lee, ’88, Kendall to honor the liberal arts tradition of the Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi. The purpose is to underwrite speakers of national prominence to Cardinal Stritch University. Speakers are selected based on their ability to encourage meaningful intellectual discussion among students and the broader Milwaukee community.


2017 Keynote Speaker: Gary Younge

Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written: Another Day in the Death of America, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?--And Should it Matter in the 21st Century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South.

Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture. In 2015 he was awarded Foreign Commentator of the Year by The UK Comment Awards and the David Nyhan Prize for political journalism from Harvard’s Shorenstein Center. “It’s the powerless on whose behalf he writes,” said the Center’s director. In 2016 he won an award from the Sandford St Martin Trust, which promotes “excellence in religious reporting,” for radio documentary about how American evangelicals were grappling with gay marriage. The Judges described it as: “a classic example of thoughtful and vividly expressed interviews bringing light and understanding to a contentious issue.” In 2007 he was awarded Honorary Doctorates by both his alma mater, Heriot Watt University, and London South Bank University. In 2009 he was appointed the Belle Zeller Visiting Professor for Public Policy and Social Administration at Brooklyn College (CUNY), where he taught both graduates and undergraduates for two years. In 2011 he moved to Chicago. In 2015 he returned to London with his wife and two children.
Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.
Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.
Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.
Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.
 

Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.

Born in Hertfordshire to Barbadian parents, he grew up in Stevenage until he was 17 when he went to teach English in a United Nations Eritrean refugee school in Sudan with Project Trust. On his return he went to Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh where he studied French and Russian, Translating and Interpreting. While at Heriot Watt he was elected Vice President (Welfare) of the Student Association, a paid sabbatical post he held for a year.

In his final year of at university he was awarded a bursary from the Guardian to study journalism at City University. Following a brief internship for Yorkshire Television he started at The Guardian in 1993. In 1996 he was awarded the prestigious Laurence Stern Fellowship, which sends a young British journalist to work at the Washington Post for three months. From 2001 to 2003 he won Best Newspaper Journalist in Britain’s Ethnic Minority Media Awards three years in a row.

After several years of reporting from all over Europe, Africa, the US and the Caribbean Gary was appointed The Guardian’s New York correspondent in 2003. His first book, No Place Like Home, published in 1999, was shortlisted for the Guardian’s first book award. His third book, Who Are We?, published in 2010, was shortlisted for the Bristol Festival of Ideas Prize. In 2009 he won the James Cameron award for the “combined moral vision and professional integrity” of his coverage of the Obama campaign. In 2015 he was awarded Foreign Commentator of the Year by The UK Comment Awards and the David Nyhan Prize for political journalism from Harvard’s Shorenstein Center. “It’s the powerless on whose behalf he writes,” said the Center’s director. In 2016 he won an award from the Sandford St Martin Trust, which promotes “excellence in religious reporting,” for radio documentary about how American evangelicals were grappling with gay marriage. The Judges described it as: “a classic example of thoughtful and vividly expressed interviews bringing light and understanding to a contentious issue.”

In 2007 he was awarded Honorary Doctorates by both his alma mater, Heriot Watt University, and London South Bank University. In 2009 he was appointed the Belle Zeller Visiting Professor for Public Policy and Social Administration at Brooklyn College (CUNY), where he taught both graduates and undergraduates for two years. In 2011 he moved to Chicago. In 2015 he returned to London with his wife and two children.

Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture. Born in Hertfordshire to Barbadian parents, he grew up in Stevenage until he was 17 when he went to teach English in a United Nations Eritrean refugee school in Sudan with Project Trust. On his return he went to Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh where he studied French and Russian, Translating and Interpreting. While at Heriot Watt he was elected Vice President (Welfare) of the Student Association, a paid sabbatical post he held for a year. In his final year of at university he was awarded a bursary from the Guardian to study journalism at City University. Following a brief internship for Yorkshire Television he started at The Guardian in 1993. In 1996 he was awarded the prestigious Laurence Stern Fellowship, which sends a young British journalist to work at the Washington Post for three months. From 2001 to 2003 he won Best Newspaper Journalist in Britain’s Ethnic Minority Media Awards three years in a row. After several years of reporting from all over Europe, Africa, the US and the Caribbean Gary was appointed The Guardian’s New York correspondent in 2003. His first book, No Place Like Home, published in 1999, was shortlisted for the Guardian’s first book award. His third book, Who Are We?, published in 2010, was shortlisted for the Bristol Festival of Ideas Prize. In 2009 he won the James Cameron award for the “combined moral vision and professional integrity” of his coverage of the Obama campaign. In 2015 he was awarded Foreign Commentator of the Year by The UK Comment Awards and the David Nyhan Prize for political journalism from Harvard’s Shorenstein Center. “It’s the powerless on whose behalf he writes,” said the Center’s director. In 2016 he won an award from the Sandford St Martin Trust, which promotes “excellence in religious reporting,” for radio documentary about how American evangelicals were grappling with gay marriage. The Judges described it as: “a classic example of thoughtful and vividly expressed interviews bringing light and understanding to a contentious issue.” In 2007 he was awarded Honorary Doctorates by both his alma mater, Heriot Watt University, and London South Bank University. In 2009 he was appointed the Belle Zeller Visiting Professor for Public Policy and Social Administration at Brooklyn College (CUNY), where he taught both graduates and undergraduates for two years. In 2011 he moved to Chicago. In 2015 he returned to London with his wife and two children.
 

Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture.

Born in Hertfordshire to Barbadian parents, he grew up in Stevenage until he was 17 when he went to teach English in a United Nations Eritrean refugee school in Sudan with Project Trust. On his return he went to Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh where he studied French and Russian, Translating and Interpreting. While at Heriot Watt he was elected Vice President (Welfare) of the Student Association, a paid sabbatical post he held for a year.

In his final year of at university he was awarded a bursary from the Guardian to study journalism at City University. Following a brief internship for Yorkshire Television he started at The Guardian in 1993. In 1996 he was awarded the prestigious Laurence Stern Fellowship, which sends a young British journalist to work at the Washington Post for three months. From 2001 to 2003 he won Best Newspaper Journalist in Britain’s Ethnic Minority Media Awards three years in a row.

After several years of reporting from all over Europe, Africa, the US and the Caribbean Gary was appointed The Guardian’s New York correspondent in 2003. His first book, No Place Like Home, published in 1999, was shortlisted for the Guardian’s first book award. His third book, Who Are We?, published in 2010, was shortlisted for the Bristol Festival of Ideas Prize. In 2009 he won the James Cameron award for the “combined moral vision and professional integrity” of his coverage of the Obama campaign. In 2015 he was awarded Foreign Commentator of the Year by The UK Comment Awards and the David Nyhan Prize for political journalism from Harvard’s Shorenstein Center. “It’s the powerless on whose behalf he writes,” said the Center’s director. In 2016 he won an award from the Sandford St Martin Trust, which promotes “excellence in religious reporting,” for radio documentary about how American evangelicals were grappling with gay marriage. The Judges described it as: “a classic example of thoughtful and vividly expressed interviews bringing light and understanding to a contentious issue.”

In 2007 he was awarded Honorary Doctorates by both his alma mater, Heriot Watt University, and London South Bank University. In 2009 he was appointed the Belle Zeller Visiting Professor for Public Policy and Social Administration at Brooklyn College (CUNY), where he taught both graduates and undergraduates for two years. In 2011 he moved to Chicago. In 2015 he returned to London with his wife and two children.

Gary Younge is an author, broadcaster and editor-at-large for The Guardian, based in London. He also writes a monthly column, Beneath the Radar, for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for The Nation Institute. He has written four books, The Speech, The Story Behind Martin Luther King’s Dream, Who Are We?, And Should it Matter in the 21st century, Stranger in a Strange Land, Travels in the Disunited States and No Place Like Home, A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South. Gary has made several radio and television documentaries on subjects ranging from the tea party to hip hop culture. Born in Hertfordshire to Barbadian parents, he grew up in Stevenage until he was 17 when he went to teach English in a United Nations Eritrean refugee school in Sudan with Project Trust. On his return he went to Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh where he studied French and Russian, Translating and Interpreting. While at Heriot Watt he was elected Vice President (Welfare) of the Student Association, a paid sabbatical post he held for a year. In his final year of at university he was awarded a bursary from the Guardian to study journalism at City University. Following a brief internship for Yorkshire Television he started at The Guardian in 1993. In 1996 he was awarded the prestigious Laurence Stern Fellowship, which sends a young British journalist to work at the Washington Post for three months. From 2001 to 2003 he won Best Newspaper Journalist in Britain’s Ethnic Minority Media Awards three years in a row. After several years of reporting from all over Europe, Africa, the US and the Caribbean Gary was appointed The Guardian’s New York correspondent in 2003. His first book, No Place Like Home, published in 1999, was shortlisted for the Guardian’s first book award. His third book, Who Are We?, published in 2010, was shortlisted for the Bristol Festival of Ideas Prize. In 2009 he won the James Cameron award for the “combined moral vision and professional integrity” of his coverage of the Obama campaign. In 2015 he was awarded Foreign Commentator of the Year by The UK Comment Awards and the David Nyhan Prize for political journalism from Harvard’s Shorenstein Center. “It’s the powerless on whose behalf he writes,” said the Center’s director. In 2016 he won an award from the Sandford St Martin Trust, which promotes “excellence in religious reporting,” for radio documentary about how American evangelicals were grappling with gay marriage. The Judges described it as: “a classic example of thoughtful and vividly expressed interviews bringing light and understanding to a contentious issue.” In 2007 he was awarded Honorary Doctorates by both his alma mater, Heriot Watt University, and London South Bank University. In 2009 he was appointed the Belle Zeller Visiting Professor for Public Policy and Social Administration at Brooklyn College (CUNY), where he taught both graduates and undergraduates for two years. In 2011 he moved to Chicago. In 2015 he returned to London with his wife and two children.

Schedule of Events

Thursday, October 26, 2017

4:00 p.m.                            Mass
7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.       Keynote Address
8:00 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.       Book signing and Reception

2017 Common Read 

Another Day in the Death of America: A Chronicle of Ten Short Lives, by Gary Younge

Choose a day at random. Any day. On that day, an average of seven American children will die from gun violence.[1] In Cardinal Stritch University’s Common Read for 2017, Another Day in the Death of America, author and editor-at-large for The Guardian Gary Younge tells the stories of these American children whose lives were ended by gun violence on one such day: Saturday, November 23, 2013. Each chapter chronicles the life of one of the children, providing rich detail and analysis of the conditions under which these deaths happen every day.
 
Through deeply moving narratives, Younge humanizes the discussion on gun violence, and reminds the reader that behind the statistics are someone’s brother, someone’s friend, someone’s child. Author Naomi Klein says of Another Day in the Death of America, “This is Gary Younge’s masterwork... Brilliantly reported, quietly indignant and utterly gripping. A book to be read through tears.”[2]
 
Coinciding with the Stritch value of the year, Creating a Caring Community, the Common Read committee chose Younge’s brilliant book in the hopes that it would open up discussion about ways that violence touches all of us, and what we can do to keep our community safe.

 


Kendall Lecture Series 

The Kendall Lecture Series, hosted by Cardinal Stritch University, in partnership with the Common Read, is thrilled to present Gary Younge as our keynote presenter. In 2017 Another Day in the Death of America won the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize from Columbia Journalism School and Nieman Foundation, and was shortlisted for the Helen Berenstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism from New York Public Library.
 
With his stirring, sharply-rendered reporting, Younge’s book has been praised as, “[i]mportant, deeply affecting, and certain to alarm readers who care about the lives of children in a gun-ridden society,” by Kirkus Reviews.[3] Another Day in the Death of America “just makes it impossible not to care,” says Entertainment Weekly.
 
Younge will be on campus to deliver a keynote presentation about his book on October 26, 2017, but join the campus community for events and additional talks scheduled from October 16-27, 2017.

Past Speakers and Events

Phil Klay is a graduate of Dartmouth College and a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He served in Iraq’s Anbar Province from January 2007 to February 2008 as a Public Affairs Officer. After being discharged, Klay received his MFA from Hunter College. He is the author of Redeployment (The Penguin Press), a powerful collection of short stories that takes readers to the front lines of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In his book and public lectures, Klay explores the complex feelings of brutality, faith, guilt, and fear that a soldier experiences during war, while also revealing the isolation and despair that can accompany a soldier’s homecoming.

With his stark, realistic depictions of war, Klay’s book has been praised as “one of the best debuts of the year” by The Oregonian and author Karen Russell calls his writing “searing and powerful, unsparing of its characters and its readers.” Redeployment won the 2014 National Book Award for Fiction and the 2015 Chautauqua Prize. His writing has also appeared in the New York Times, Granta, Newsweek, The Daily Beast, New York Daily News, Tin House, and The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2012. For more information on this speaker please visit www.prhspeakers.com.

 

A Connection to the 2016 Common Read


 

Cardinal Stritch University is thrilled to introduce our 2016 Common Read book, Redeployment by Phil Klay.

United States Marine Corps veteran Phil Klay wowed critics and readers alike with his short story collection Redeployment, which was named “one of the best debuts of the year” (The Oregonian) and won the 2014 National Book Award for Fiction.

Kendall Lecture Series Presents: “This Star Won’t Go Out”
Lori and Wayne Earl will share their daughter Esther’s life and legacy of empathy, joy and compassion. Diagnosed with cancer at 12, in her four remaining years Esther taught us that life isn’t measured by days, but by love, which is stronger than even death.

Lori and Wayne Earl are the parents of the late Esther Earl, who fought a courageous battle with cancer before passing away at age 16. Esther was an inspiration for the bestselling book by John Green, “The Fault in Our Stars”, which became the basis for a hit movie of the same name earlier this year. The book has become a No. 1 New York Times bestseller and a source of inspiration to millions, and the film adaptation has made more than $263 million at the box office worldwide.

In addition, the Earls decided to further honor their daughter with a book of their own, “This Star Won’t Go Out: The Life & Words of Esther Grace Earl”, a collection of Esther’s journal entries, letters, online chat transcripts with friends, and other correspondence. The Earls also founded the nonprofit organization This Star Won’t Go Out whose mission is to financially assist families struggling through the journey of a child living with cancer. To date, the Foundation has given away more than $175,000 to families in need.

Upcoming Events