Alcohol and Drug Policies

Alcohol and Other Drug Policy/Student Policy Statement


In the State of Wisconsin, the legal age for consumption of alcohol is 21. Students under the legal age who consume, possess, buy, serve, or sell alcoholic beverages or individuals who sell to or serve minors are in violation of both state law and University policy.

Philosophy

The University has established the following policy with regard to alcohol and other drugs (AOD) to ensure that it meets its obligation to students, employees, funding sources and the community. The goal of this policy is to balance our respect for students with the need to maintain a safe, productive and drug-free environment. The intent of this policy is to offer compassion and aid for students suffering from alcohol and other drug problems, to protect the University community and to send a clear message that students are expected to obey the law and take personal responsibility for their conduct.

Therefore, Stritch is committed to maintaining campus-wide alcohol and other drug prevention and early intervention programs. The University expects its students, faculty and staff to share responsibility for campus-wide prevention and early intervention efforts through education, re- search and community outreach as well as AOD-free activities. Early intervention programs have been designed to assist with the early identification of AOD problems and to help in selecting appropriate solutions and/or referrals.

Student Standards of Conduct Related to Alcohol and Other Drugs

1. No use, possession, sale, manufacture, trade or distribution of alcohol, drug paraphernalia or illicit drugs is permitted.   The only exception is responsible use of alcohol for legal drinking- ageindividuals who are either:

a.       at a University-sanctioned event where a permit has been obtained, or

b.      in a legal-age student's residence hall room when no underage persons are present.

2.       It is a violation of the policy for a student to report to the University classroom/clinical site with the presence of alcohol or illegal drugs in his/her body.

3.       If a student is taking prescribed medication that will affect the student’s ability  to  perform  his/her  work,  the  instructor should be notified.  Prescription drugs are to be used only by the person for whom the prescription was written.

4.       Students who drink on- or off-campus and exhibit irresponsible behavior (i.e. public disturbances, danger to self or others, destruction of property, alcohol-related sickness or inability to care for oneself) will be subject to sanctions.

5.       The University staff and concerned persons reserve the right to call 911 in cases of suspected alcohol poisoning, drug over- dose, or when an individual is unconscious, or is perceived to be a danger to self or others. Individuals receiving medical treatment will be responsible for the costs incurred.

6.       Kegs, tappers, party punches, beer bongs, drinking games, or drug paraphernalia are not permitted on University property.

7.       No person shall provide assistance to a student under the age of 21 in obtaining access to alcohol.  This includes, but is not limited to, purchasing or providing alcohol, transferring or storing alcohol, or providing with an ID card intended to deceive others.

8.      No open containers are permitted in public areas (hallway, lounges, etc.) without a permit.  For student-sponsored events, special permission may be sought through the Student Success Center for consumption of alcoholic beverages by legal-age students at the site of the event.

9.     Students of legal drinking age may drink only in a room of a legal aged student with the room door shut.   No person may drink or bring alcohol into the room of an underage student.

10.   No underage person can be present in a room where alcohol is being consumed even if the underage person is not drinking.

11.   Mass quantities of alcohol are not permitted in the residence halls or any other part of campus.  Of age residents with excessive quantities will be given the opportunity to remove the alcohol from the building, or have to empty out the containers.   Any amount of alcohol belonging to underage students will be emptied.

12.   It is against state law and University policy to misrepresent one’s age and/or falsify one’s identification card.  All altered or “fake” identification cards (driver’s license, school ID card, etc.) will be confiscated by University representatives and/or are subject to police referral. Additionally, individuals who provide others with false identification are subject to disciplinary action by the University and/or referral to the police.

13.    Residence hall students are responsible for their behavior and for that of their guests. Students may be sanctioned for their own inappropriate drinking and that of their guests. Residence hall guests violating the policy who are Stritch students will also be sanctioned for their violations. Uncooperative guests may have their guest privileges revoked, and will be referred to security or the police if they refuse to leave peaceably.

14.   Residence hall staff retains the right to inspect students' rooms and property if suspicion of illegal activity exists. Likewise, the Department of Security reserves the right to inspect commuter lockers and other University property if suspicion of illegal activities exists.  Suspicion may be generated by odor, loud noise, observable drugs, alcohol or drug paraphernalia and/or other evidence of drug usage and will result in confiscation of such materials. In the event of an alcohol incident, all empty containers in the student's room may be considered as evidence that usage has occurred. For further details regarding the process for room inspection, please see the Residence Hall Handbook.

Alcohol Sanctions

Students are expected to follow Wisconsin state laws and University policies relating to alcohol use.  When students fail to meet this responsibility, serious consequences will result that may impact one’s status as a student.  Depending on the circumstances, the local police may be contacted.  Parents may be contacted for alcohol violations. The following procedures are designed to handle cases of alleged misconduct in fairness to all concerned. 

After receiving a written invitation, the student will arrange a meeting with an administrative hearing officer.  Students who have violated the alcohol policy will receive disciplinary action.  Such action may include, but is not limited to, probation, community service, restitution, housing reassignment (resident students only), educational assignments, and substance abuse screening.  Specific sanctions will be based upon the nature of the incident, the impact of the incident on self and others, any prior violations of the Student Conduct Code, and the student’s cooperation in resolving the situation.

Students who have violated the alcohol policy are required to meet with the staff in the Wellness Center for an initial assessment, according to the timetable established by the hearing officer.  Depending on the results of the initial assessment, interventions may include a substance abuse screening inventory, alcohol abuse prevention/education sessions, and/or other counseling interventions that are determined to be appropriate for each individual situation. Costs for the initial assessment, and any outside referrals, are the responsibility of the student.

Repeated violations, or a single violation that causes significant disruption of the community, can result in suspension or expulsion from the Residence Hall and/or the University. Students who do not complete the assigned sanctions within the designated time period may also be suspended or expelled from the Residence Hall and/or University.

Alcohol sanctions remain on a student’s disciplinary record.  The accumulation of 3 alcohol violations will result in a suspension or expulsion from University housing and/or the University.

Students who are found responsible for an alcohol violation will face the following sanctions. These sanctions do not preclude further disciplinary action resulting from accompanying behavior.  In the case of resident students, these sanctions are in addition to sanctions outlined by the residence hall handbook. These penalties are cumulative for the student’s academic career at the University.  Students who do not follow through with assigned sanctions may be suspended or expelled from the Residence Hall and/or the University.

First Offense

  1. Confiscation and disposal of all alcoholic beverages in student’s possession by a University staff member who will then document the incident and notify a Residence Life Coordinator and/or the Director of Student Experience of the policy violation. Depending on the circumstances, the University may contact local police.
  2. After receiving notification of a policy violation an Administrative Hearing Officer will contact, in writing or University issued e-mail account, those involved in the situation.  Students will be instructed to arrange a meeting with the appropriate University official in a timely manner as specified by the written notification.
  3. Arrange for an appointment with Counseling Services within three days of meeting with an Administrative Hearing Officer. When meeting with the appropriate University official to discuss the incident, students will sign an Authorization for Release of Information form in order for the University to verify completion of these sessions with Counseling Services. A meeting with Counseling Services may include an additional assessments and referrals.   Students will be responsible for the cost of any assessment as well as the completion of any assignments or recommendations as determined by Counseling Services.
  4. Fine of $25 to be used for residence hall improvements.
  5. A minimum of 3 hours community service time as determined by the Administrative Hearing Officer.
  6. Possible notification of parent or guardian.

Second Offense

  1. Confiscation and disposal of all alcoholic beverages in student’s possession by a University staff member who will then document the incident and notify a Residence Life Coordinator and/or the Director of Student Experience of the policy violation. Depending on the circumstances, the University may contact local police.
  2. After receiving  notification  of  a  policy  violation  an  Administrative Hearing Officer will contact, in writing or University issued e-mail account, those involved in the situation.  Students will be instructed to arrange a meeting with the appropriate University official in a timely manner as specified by the written notification.
  3. Arrange for an appointment with Counseling Services within three days of meeting with an Administrative Hearing Officer.   When meeting with the appropriate University official to discuss the incident, students will sign an Authorization for Release of Information form in order for the University to verify completion of these sessions with Counseling Services. A meeting with Counseling Services may include an additional assessments and referrals.  Students will be responsible for the cost of any assessment as well as the completion of any assignments or recommendations as determined by Counseling Services.
  4. Fine of $50 to be used for residence hall improvements.
  5. A minimum of 6 hours community service time as determined by the Administrative Hearing Officer.
  6. Possible notification of parent or guardian.
  7. University disciplinary probation status.

Third Offense

  1. Automatic suspension or expulsion from Residence Life Housing if a resident student.
  2. Additional disciplinary action as determined by an Administrative Hearing Officer.
  3. Possible notification of parent or guardian.
  4. Re-admittance may occur based on the completion of the terms outlined in the suspension letter.

Drugs

Misconduct:  Use, possession, sale, manufacture, trade or distribution of drug paraphernalia or illicit drugs: illicit drugs are all illegal drugs and prescription drugs not prescribed for the student. The possession or use of salvia divinorum and synthetic marijuana (K2, Spice, etc.) is also prohibited on-campus.

Students who are responsible for a drug violation will face the following penalties.  Additional sanctions will be levied depending on accompanying behavior.  These penalties are cumulative for the student's academic career at the University.  Under most circumstances, the University will contact local police. Police will confiscate all drugs and/or drug paraphernalia.

Sanctions - Students who do not follow through with assigned sanctions may be suspended or expelled from the Residence Hall and/or University.

Drug Paraphernalia

First Offense - Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

  1.  Notification of University security and possible referral to local Police.
  2. A minimum penalty of probation in the Residence Hall and/or University.
  3. Within one business day of the incident arrange a meeting with an Administrative Hearing Officer.
  4. Arrange for an appointment, within one business day from meeting with an Administrative Hearing Officer, with the University Counseling Services. Prior to the appointment, students will sign a release of information form with the hearing officer to verify that they followed through on the appointment and the subsequent recommendations. This may also include an additional referral to a licensed AODA com- munity agency for further assessment at the student's expense. Students are expected to follow through with any recommendations.
  5. The student will also be required to participate in an alcohol and drug educational skill-building program.  The format will be decided by Counseling Services.
  6. Fine of $25 to be used for residence hall improvements.
  7. A minimum of 6 hours community service time as determined by the Administrative Hearing Officer.
  8. Possible notification of parent or guardian.
  9. Participation in an unannounced drug-screening program at the student's expense for a period of one calendar year while enrolled in classes or participating in University-sponsored activities. Students who test positive for drugs will be suspended or expelled from the Residence Hall and/or University.

Second Offense- Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

  1. Referral to local police.
  2. Within one business day of the incident, the student will arrange a meet- ing with an Administrative Hearing Officer.
  3. Suspension or expulsion from the Residence Hall and/or University.
  4. Students who are not removed from the University will be required to meet with University Counseling Services, according to the time table established by the hearing officer.  Prior to the appointment, students will sign a release of information form with the hearing officer to verify that they followed through on the appointment and the subsequent recommendations.
  5. Students will receive a mandatory referral for an AODA assessment by a licensed agency at the student’s expense.  This must be completed by a timeframe established in conjunction with University Counseling Services, who will facilitate the referral.  Students will sign a release of information form with University Counseling Services to verify that they followed through on the appointment and the subsequent recommendations.
  6. Any student allowed to continue at the University after a second paraphernalia violation will need to submit to unannounced drug testing at the student’s expense for a period of one calendar year while enrolled in classes or participating in University-sponsored activities.  Students who test positive for drugs will be suspended or expelled from the Residence Hall and/or University.
  7. Fine of $50 to be used for residence hall improvements.
  8. A minimum of 12 hours community service time as determined by the Administrative Hearing Officer.
  9. Possible notification of parent or guardian.

Possession and/or Use of Drugs

First Offense- Possession and/or Use of Drugs

  1. Referral to local Police.
  2. Within  one  business  day  of  the  incident,  the  student  will arrange a meeting with a hearing officer; either a Residence Life Coordinator or the Director of Student Experience.
  3. Probation and/or suspension or expulsion from the Residence Hall and/or University.
  4. Any student allowed to continue at the University after a drug violation will need to submit to unannounced drug testing at the student's expense for a period of one calendar year while enrolled in classes or participating in University-sponsored activities. Students who test positive for drugs will be suspended or expelled from the Residence Hall and/or University.
  5. A student who is allowed to continue will arrange for an appointment with Counseling Services according to the timeline established by the hearing official.  This will also include an additional referral to a licensed AODA community agency for further assessment at the student's expense. Students are expected to follow through with any recommendations. Students will sign appropriate release of information forms to verify that they have completed their responsibilities.
  6. The student will be expected to participate in an alcohol and other drug educational program or one-on-one counseling as determined by Counseling Services.
  7. Fine of $25 to be used for residence hall improvements.
  8. A minimum of 10 hours community service time as determined by the Administrative Hearing Officer.
  9. Possible notification of parent or guardian.

Second Offense - Possession and/or Use of Drugs

  1. Immediate referral to local police and automatic suspension or expulsion from the Residence Life Housing and the University.
  2. Re-admittance may occur if the student can demonstrate completion of a drug treatment program or equivalent based on the terms outlined in the suspension letter.

C.  Sale, Manufacture, or Distribution of Drugs

Any student found to be selling, manufacturing, distributing or facilitating the sale of drugs will be immediately referred to the local police and receive an automatic expulsion from residence life housing and the University.

Drug Convictions Make Student Ineligible for Financial Aid

A federal law denies financial aid to students recently convicted in state or federal court of possessing or selling illicit drugs. This penalty applies to all drug convictions - including misdemeanor possession charges.

Intervention for a Suspected Alcohol and/or Other Drug (AOD) Problem

Medical Intervention

Cardinal Stritch University considers the safety and personal well-being of each student a priority. The University recognizes that there may be alcohol or other drug-related medical or safety emergencies in which the potential for disciplinary action could act as a deterrent to students who want to seek assistance for themselves or others. Medical Intervention is designed to enable dangerously intoxicated or impaired students, or their peers, to receive the immediate, professional medical treatment they need.

When a student aids an intoxicated or impaired individual by contacting Security or Residence Life staff for assistance, neither the intoxicated individual nor the student reporting the emergency will be subject to formal disciplinary action for the consumption or possession of alcohol or other drugs as a first offense.  In rare circumstances such as cases where other violations occur, students may be subject to the conduct process. Examples include, but are not limited to, physical abuse, sexual assault, conduct which threatens safety, verbal or physical harassment, disorderly conduct or property damage. Medical Intervention does not apply for subsequent alcohol or other drug intoxications or impairments.

Treatment

Intoxicated or impaired students who are medically evaluated or hospitalized for alcohol or other drug use:

  1. In the case of a serious medical issue the University will generally contact parents or guardians. In these cases, parental notification is not taken as a disciplinary action but as a precautionary measure.
  2. Will be required to have a follow up meeting with a Residence Life Coordinator or the Director of Student Experience. Following this meeting, the student will receive a letter that will describe the expectations of the student in more detail.
  3. Will arrange and complete for an appointment(s) with Counseling Services. When meeting with a Residence Life Coordinator or the Director of Student Experience, students will sign an Authorization for Release of Information form in order for the University to verify completion of appointments with Counseling  Services.  A meeting with Counseling Services may include additional assessments and recommendations.  Students will be expected to follow any recommendations.
  4. May also be referred to an outside program for substance abuse evaluation and appropriate treatment at the expense of the student.

Long Term Intervention

Counseling Services staff in the Wellness Center are available to assist with planning/implementing an intervention. It is the responsibility of the instructor or professional staff member to confront a student whenever changes in performance or behavior suggest a student has an AOD problem. Although it is not the job of the instructor to diagnose the student’s problem, the instructor should encourage such a student to seek help in Counseling Services.

Treatment

After assessment, if treatment is deemed necessary, the student is referred to a recognized agency for rehabilitation.

  1. Counseling Services will assist in making appropriate treatment arrangements.
  2. A student in rehabilitation may be permitted to continue class attendance.
  3. If in-patient treatment for a student is deemed necessary by the assessment agency, arrangements will be made for leave time on a case by case basis with the Director of Student Experience.
  4. If there is evidence of continued use of alcohol/drugs, such use shall be addressed through the Student Code of Conduct.

Evaluation

The student will be regularly evaluated for symptoms of continued use. This may include alcohol and other drug testing.

  1. Follow up sessions will be coordinated by those persons responsible for the initial intervention.
  2. Nothing in these procedures abrogates other established University policies and procedures for dismissal.

Health Effects of Alcohol and Other Drugs

The following is a partial list of drugs and related consequences of their use.  This list includes only some of the known risks and not all legal or illegal drugs are covered.

Alcohol

Alcohol is the most frequently abused drug on campus and in society. Alcohol is chemically classified as a mind-altering drug because it contains ethanol and has the chemical power to depress the action of the central nervous system. This depression affects motor coordination, speech and vision. In great amounts, it can affect respiration and heart rate control. Death can result with high levels of blood alcohol.  Prolonged abuse of alcohol can lead to alcoholism, malnutrition and cirrhosis of the liver.  Alcohol is associated with academic and social problems such as sexual assault, violence, homicide and vandalism.

Cocaine and Crack

Cocaine and crack  stimulate  the  central  nervous system and are extremely addictive. They can cause psychological and physical dependency that can lead to increased pulse rate, elevated blood pressure, insomnia, loss of appetite, paranoia and seizures. They can also cause death by disrupting the brain’s control of the heart and respiration.

Depressants and Barbiturates

Depressants such as Rohypnol and barbiturates such as Seconal and Nembutal can cause physical and psychological dependence that can lead to respiratory depression, coma and death, especially when used in concert with alcohol; withdrawal can lead to restlessness, insomnia, convulsions and even death.  Depressants such as Rohypnol and GHB are sometimes dropped into open drinks of unsuspecting students resulting in unconsciousness and subsequent sexual assault. Some body building supplements are metabolized into GHB also resulting in unconsciousness.

Ecstasy and MDMA

Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug with hallucinogenic and amphetamine-like properties.  Ecstasy (MDMA) users may encounter problems similar to those experienced by cocaine users.   Its psychological effects can include confusion, depression, sleep problems, anxiety and paranoia during, and sometimes weeks after taking the drug.

MDMA use damages brain serotonin neurons. Serotonin is thought to play a role in regulating mood, memory, sleep and appetite. Research indicates that heavy MDMA use causes persistent memory problems in humans. Recent research has also shown that even one time use can trigger a neurological sequence which causes permanent memory disturbance.

Physical effects can include muscle tension, involuntary teeth-clenching, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, and chills or sweating. Increases in heart rate and blood pressure are a special risk for people with circulatory or heart disease.

MDMA-related fatalities at raves have been reported. The stimulant effects of the drug, combined with the hot, crowded conditions usually found at raves can lead to dehydration, hyperthermia, and heart or kidney failure.

Hallucinogens

LSD, PCP, mescaline and peyote are classified as hallucinogens. Hallucinogens interrupt brain messages that control the intellect and keep instincts in check.  Large doses can produce convulsions and coma, heart and lung failure. Chronic users complain of persistent memory problems and speech difficulties for up to a year after their use. Because the drugs stop the brain’s pain sensors, drug experiences may result in severe self- inflicted injuries.

Marijuana and Hashish

Marijuana and hashish are deleterious to the health and impair the short-term memory and comprehension of the user. They alter the sense of time and reduce the ability of the user to perform tasks requiring concentration and coordination; they increase the heart rate and appetite. Motivation and cognition can be altered, making acquisition and retention of new information difficult. Long-term users may develop psychological dependence that can produce paranoia and psychosis. Because this drug is inhaled as unfiltered smoke, it is damaging to the lungs and pulmonary system and has more cancer-causing agents than tobacco.

Narcotics

Users of narcotics, such as heroin, codeine, morphine and opium, develop dependence and increase the likelihood of an overdose that can lead to convulsions, coma and death.

Stimulants and amphetamines

Stimulants and amphetamines such as Dexedrine and Ritalin can have the same effect as cocaine and cause increased heart rates and blood pressure that can result in stroke or heart failure. Symptoms include dizziness, sleeplessness, anxiety and physical collapse. Use can also lead to psychosis, hallucinations, and paranoia.

Tobacco

Nicotine is highly addictive, whether ingested by smoking or chewing. This drug reaches the brain in six seconds, damages the lungs, decreases heart strength and is associated with many cancers. The withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, progressive restlessness, irritability and sleep disturbance.

State of Wisconsin Federal and Legal Sanction

The laws of Wisconsin prohibit drug possession and delivery through the Uniform Controlled Substances Act, Wis. Stats. 961, and mandate stiff penalties including large fines and long periods of imprisonment. A person with a first-time conviction of possession of a controlled substance can be sentenced up to one year in prison and fined up to $5,000, Wis. Stats. 961.41 (2r). The penalties vary according to the amount and type of drug confiscated, the number of previous offenses by the individual and whether the  individual intended to manufacture the drug, sell or possess the drug. See Wis. Stats. 961.41. In addition to the stringent penalties for possession or delivery, the sentences can be doubled when exacerbating factors are present, such as when a person distributes a controlled substance to a minor, Wis. Stats. 961.46(1).

Substantial restrictions against the sale, possession and distribution of alcohol also exist in Wisconsin. It is against the law to sell alcohol to anyone who has not reached the legal drinking age of 21 and there is a concurrent duty on the part of an adult to  prevent the illegal consumption of alcohol on his/her premises, Wis. Stats.125.07(1)(a). Violation of this statute can result in up to a $500 forfeiture for a first offense, with higher fines and imprisonment for subsequent violations. It is against the law for an underage person to attempt to buy an alcoholic beverage, falsely    represent his/her age, or enter a licensed premises except to conduct lawful business (i.e. eating in a restaurant). First offenders can be required to forfeit up to $500, ordered to participate in a supervised work program and have their driver’s license suspended, Wis. Stats.125.07(4).

The federal government revised the penalties against drug possession and trafficking when it adopted the Federal Sentencing Guidelines that reduce or eliminate the discretion that federal judges may use in sentencing offenders of federal drug statutes. Under current statutes, courts can sentence a per- son up to one year of imprisonment and a $5,000 fine for unlawful possession of a controlled substance such as marijuana. Federal law creates special penalties for the possession of certain drugs such as cocaine base, also known as crack.  For the possession of 5 grams of cocaine base, a federal judge is obligated to sentence a person to at least 5 years (and up to 20 years) imprisonment. A sentence of life imprisonment is required for a conviction for the distribution of a controlled substance that results in death or bodily injury. The Federal Sentencing Guidelines eliminated parole in the federal judicial system.

Stritch AOD Resources

Anyone interested in receiving assistance with an AOD issue should contact one of the following offices:

  • Wellness Center Counseling Services -- (414) 410-4197
  • Director of Student Affairs -- (414) 410-4329
  • Residence Life Coordinator (Assisi) -- (414) 410-4252
  • Residence Life Coordinator (Clare) -- (414) 410-4504
  • Resident Assistants -- (via Front Desks)
  • (Clare Hall)   -- (414) 410-4515
  • (Assisi Hall) -- (414) 410-4517

Alcohol/Drug Abuse – Community Referral Agencies


  • Addiction Resource Council -- (262) 524-7921
  • Alcoholics Anonymous --  (414) 771-9119
  • Milwaukee Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (Impact)  -- (414) 276-8487
  • Starting Point of Ozaukee --  (262) 375-1110
  • “Focus on Community” Racine Council on Alcohol & Drug Abuse -- (262) 632-6200
  • Crisis Center -- (262) 752-0751

Selected Treatment Agencies


  • Aurora Sinai Behavioral Health   -- (414) 219-5000
  • Aurora Psychiatric Hospital – Wauwatosa -- (414) 454-6600
  • Genesis Behavioral Services Inc. (24 hrs) -- (414) 342-6200
  • Community Information Line (IMPACT) -- (414) 773-0211*
  • Lutheran Social Services Outpatient -- (414) 325-3096
  • Meta House (women) -- (414) 962-1200**
  • St. Mary’s Hospital Ozaukee -- (262) 243-7300
  • St. Mary’s Hospital Milwaukee -- (414) 961-3300

Madison, WI: National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Dane County, (608) 249-7188, email: contact@namidanecounty.org

St. Paul, MN: Mental Health Association of Minnesota, (651) 493-6634 or (800) 862-1799, email: info@mentalhealthmn.org

Chicago, IL:  Mental Health American of Illinoi, (312) 368-9070, website: http://www.mhai.org/

*    2-1-1 @ IMPACT is a central access point for Milwaukee County residents who need assistance with family, health and social services. This 24- hour central access point for information and referral serves that include the following: emergency food, alcohol or other drug abuse, health care, homelessness and emergency shelter, financial assistance, family and parenting issues, mental health care, legal assistance, housing concerns. When someone calls 2-1-1 @ IMPACT, they will speak with a Community Resource Specialist - a professional trained to listen carefully to the caller's needs, help assess their situation and connect them to an agency that will respond to their needs.

**  Meta House, Inc. is a substance abuse treatment program dedicated to helping women through the progression of recovery. Meta House is dedicated to helping women reclaim their lives from the effects of substance abuse.