Sociology Courses

SC 101 - Introduction to Sociology

(Credits: 3.00)

This includes basic concepts for the understanding and analysis of social reality. The focus is on patterns of social interaction; the structure and functions of groups; culture as setting and product of human social life; inequalities based on class, race and gender; social process; social change, social trends; major social institutions such as family, economy, government, education, and religion.

SC 201 - Contemporary Social Problems

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will feature the sociological approach to the study of social problems including the identification, definition, and analysis of what constitutes a social problem. The focus will be on select contemporary social problems of the United States chosen by students and instructor. Prerequisite: SC 101 or sophomore standing.

SC 202 - Social Psychology

(Credits: 3.00)

This is the study of the social factors influencing the development of personality and the process of socialization; the factors influencing the formation of attitudes; the effectiveness of various methods or patterns of persuasion; intergroup relationships; structure and processes of small groups; and factors influencing a variety of forms of social behavior are discussed. Prerequisite: SC 101 or sophomore standing.

SC 203 - Racial and Ethnic Groups

(Credits: 3.00)

This course reviews the major concepts of the sociology of race and ethnicity. Students will study race and ethnic groups in the US and in international comparison. The structural and cultural dimensions of race and ethnicity with a focus on the dynamics of inequality will be explored. Students will discuss current policies and programs affecting racial and ethnic minorities through readings, speakers, and media presentations. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

SC 204 - Social Hactivism

(Credits: 3.00)

This course explores social change through a hacker ethic. In other words, we will examine how to make the world a better, more connected place, through the use of social networks and other digital technology. Through both offline and online experiences, we will investigate how social and cultural groups can use technology to produce results similar to traditional activism, such as human rights, access to resources, and connecting local and global communities. In keeping with the ethic of openness, community collaboration, and the decentralization of power, part of the course content will be user-generated. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

SC 206 - Marriage, Families and Divorce

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will examine micro- and macro-sociological changes in American families including the decrease of traditional two-parent families and increase of single-parent families, cohabitation, divorce, remarriage, same-sex relationships, and blended families; conflict and feminist perspectives on class, gender, race and ethnicity as they relate to marriage, families, and family values controversies; dating, mate selection, intimacy, sexuality, and interpersonal communication.

SC 210 - Social Welfare Policy and Social Welfare

(Credits: 3.00)

Students will be introduced to the social work profession and social welfare policy. The course includes the history, mission and philosophy of social work; issues involving diversity in ethnic background, race, class, gender and culture in our society; the nature and effects of social policy; current social policy analysis; political and organizational processes used to influence policy; and the framework of current social policy as it is related to social and economic justice. Prerequisite: SC 101 or sophomore standing.

SC 211 - Social Work Practice Methods I

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will cover values, ethics, and practices of the social work professional; the client system in social work; assessment of client strengths and problems; implications for social work practice of highly diverse client backgrounds and at-risk populations; intervening and collaborating with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Please note that SC 211 and SC 212 may be taken in any order. Prerequisite: SC 210 or consent of instructor.

SC 212 - Social Work Practice Methods II

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will place emphasis on new trends and issues in social work practice, and their implications for the ethics and values of professional social workers. Issues to be explored include assessment in social work practice and intervening and collaborating with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities; special emphasis will be placed on group process, priority action and use of the Internet. Please note that SC 211 and SC 212 may be taken in any order. Prerequisite: SC 210 or consent of instructor.

SC 216 - Social Work Practice Methods III

(Credits: 3.00)

This undergraduate course provides knowledge of generalist social work practice methods for working with communities, organizations and social institutions. Organizational and community issues related to ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, disability and spirituality will be explored along with mechanisms and consequences of oppression and discrimination (racism, sexism, classism, ageism). Throughout the course, emphasis will be given to theoretical and evidence-based practice as well as to ethical principles of the social work profession. Prerequisite: SC 101. Corequisite: SC 101.

SC 225 - Crime and Punishment

(Credits: 3.00)

This course focuses on recent trends in crime; theories and research explaining crime and criminal behavior; and societal responses to crime including law enforcement, imprisonment, capital punishment, as well as contemporary alternatives such as restorative justice and community-based programs.

SC 230 - Death and Dying

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will address death from a sociological perspective; this means students will look at dying not as a preexisting physical fact, but as a constantly changing social relation interpreted through various cultural and social realities. The course will examine how people (and others) experience, give social order to, and make sense of death and dying. Themes may include ceremonial aspects of dying and death; the role of the funeral industry; medical-technology models and the institutionalization of death and dying; and alternatives prevalent in different cultures or historical periods, and among American cultural minorities. Prerequisite: SC 101 or sophomore standing.

SC 240 - Poverty and Welfare in America

(Credits: 3.00)

This course explores causes and consequences of poverty in America from the perspective of the poor, with special focus on gender, race, and age; review of historical influences on poverty and public policy with emphasis on changes in inequality since World War II; implications for society as a whole of social forces and institutions associated with poverty, such as unemployment, homelessness, crime, health care, family dysfunction, and education; evaluation of alternative social welfare policies from social and ethical perspectives.

SC 280 - Sociology of Work

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will cover the review and analysis of historical and contemporary economic trends and their impact on work at the micro and macro level. Students will study: an overview of theoretical and empirical research on organizations and bureaucracies; analysis of intersections among work, family, and leisure, and links among inequality, race, gender, and work; examinations of unions and professional organizations; a review of public policy debates and legislation regarding corporations and work-related issues. Students will explore international comparisons. Prerequisite: SC 101 or sophomore standing.

SC 300 - Sociology of Deviant Behavior

(Credits: 3.00)

This is an analysis of the social aspects of deviant behavior and the various theories employed to understand it. Mental illness, alcohol and drug abuse, non-traditional sexual behavior, and deviance in the workplace and professions will be examined. Prerequisite: SC 101 or sophomore standing.

SC 301 - Sociology of the Body

(Credits: 3.00)

This course addresses the body from a sociological perspective; this means we will look at the body not as a preexisting physical fact, but as a constantly changing social relation interpreted through the lens of culture and shaped by social life. The course will examine how humans 'perform' individual and group identities through their bodies, as well as how bodies are used in the name of social control and domination. Themes may include medicalization, tattooing and body piercing, beauty standards and plastic surgery, transgenderism, race and ethnicity, sport, consumption, aging and disability. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

SC 302 - Special Areas in Sociology

(Credits: 3.00)

This will cover topics of a specialized nature including: aging; contemporary American culture; class, status, and power; social change; education; and sociology of religion. Prerequisite: SC 101 or consent of instructor.

SC 304 - Sociological Theory

(Credits: 3.00)

This is an introduction to classical and contemporary sociological theory, and includes a review of major schools of social theory and their relationship to the discipline of sociology and the broader social, political, and cultural context of U.S. society. Prerequisite: SC 101, sophomore standing.

SC 305 - Urban Sociology

(Credits: 3.00)

This is an introduction to the study of cities and metropolitan areas. Students will cover an historical review of the growth of cities to their current spatial configurations in contemporary society, giving special attention to class structure, power structure, politics and ethnic communities. Students also will examine social problems facing American cities: urban sprawl, economic and community development, inequality, housing, education, crime, environment, and the changing community in the broader national and global context. Prerequisite: SC 101, sophomore standing.

SC 306 - Social Movements

(Credits: 3.00)

This course explores social movements as an object of sociological research. It reviews theories of social movements, the role of social structure, patterns of mobilization and participation, strategy and tactics, and empirical studies of modern social movements. It also explores the motivations and experiences of movement actors. Prerequisite: Sc 101 or consent of instructor.

SC 310 - Sociology of Sport

(Credits: 3.00)

This course focuses on sports as social and cultural phenomena. Students will use sociological concepts and critical thinking to investigate such issues as how sport and sport participation affect people's lives, and how they intersect with masculinity, femininity, class inequality, race, work, and leisure. Prerequisite: SC 101.

SC 315 - Juvenile Delinquency

(Credits: 3.00)

This course covers analysis of the causes and consequences of juvenile delinquent behavior. Students will pay special attention to race, class, and gender-based inequalities in the conception of delinquency, rates of engagement in delinquent behavior, and treatment/punishment of offenders. Emphasis is on contemporary issues related to juvenile delinquency. Prerequisite: SC 101 or sophomore standing.

SC 380 - Research Methods

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will include: explanations of theory testing using empirical research; exploration of different measurement techniques; production of data using a variety of data collection methods, such as surveys, participant observation, experiments, secondary analysis and content analysis; non-probability and probability sampling techniques; analysis of data using statistics and qualitative techniques; and ethical issues in empirical research. Prerequisite: SC 101 and MT 120 or approval of instructor.

SC 400 - Directed Study

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

Students will be required to do reading and/or research on a sociological topic with a departmental faculty member. Written consent of instructor is required. Prerequisite: SC 101 and consent of instructor.

SC 401 - Senior Seminar

(Credits: 3.00)

The course features application of the sociological perspective with principal emphasis on the formulation, design and completion of an original empirical research study in fulfillment of the requirement for the senior culminating experiences. The course includes reflection on sociological perspectives and professional ethics. Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor approval.

SC 403 - Sociology Field Experience (Internship)

(Credits: 1.00 - 4.00)

This is an internship experience in appropriate local organizations and social service agencies. The course is designed for students to gain practical experience through on-site learning. Supervision will be shared by the Sociology Department and the cooperating organization. Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor approval.