Biology Courses

BL 101 - Biological Sciences for Early Childhood Teachers

(Credits: 3.00)

This activity-based course introduces students to the basic principles in biological sciences that will be applicable to their future as early childhood educators. The intent of this course is to prepare students using the guidelines of the Department of Public Instruction. Topics covered in this course are vital for early childhood teachers to take the state-mandated science content test (Praxis II). This course is only open to students who are enrolled in the Early Childhood Program.

BL 102 - Principles of Biology

(Credits: 4.00)

This course includes a study of some of the basic concepts of molecular biology, cell theory and structure, cell division and reproduction, energy acquisition and expenditure by organisms, evolution, plant structure and function, animal systems and genetics. This course can be used to fulfill a core requirement in the natural sciences. Students who register for this course must also register for lab BL 102L for the same term. Lab Fee Required.

BL 103 - Biological Sciences for Elementary and Middle School Teachers

(Credits: 3.00)

This is an activity-based course designed for teachers who will be teaching in the elementary grades. This course reflects the Wisconsin Learner Standards for the Biological Sciences. Students will study cell theory, plant and animal structure and function, how science is a mode of inquiry, science's role in today's society, and how to use the skills and processes of scientific inquiry. This course is only for students majoring in education. Prerequisite: Open to students majoring in education or departmental approval. Lab Fee Required.

BL 104 - Concepts of Genetics

(Credits: 4.00)

This is an introductory human genetics course intended for the non-science major. This course explores how certain traits are inherited and the molecular basis of that inheritance. Societal implications arising from genetic research and technology also will be explored. This course can be used to fulfill a core requirement in the natural sciences. Students who register for this course must also register for lab BL 104L for the same term. Lab Fee Required.

BL 105 - General Biology I

(Credits: 4.00)

This is an introductory course for biology majors that is also open to non-majors. In this course, students will be introduced to cell division and reproduction, principles of genetic inheritance, gene theory and genetic engineering, and the theory of evolution including the history of the earth, natural selection and methods of speciation. For non-majors, this course can be used to fulfill a core requirement in the natural sciences. Prerequisite: Open to students majoring in science, psychology or departmental approval. Lab Fee Required.

BL 106 - General Biology II

(Credits: 4.00)

This is an introductory course for majors. Students will be introduced to the biology of the cell, how organisms acquire and expend energy, and the basic structure and function of plant and animal organs, tissues and cells. Students who register for this course must also register for lab BL 106L for the same term. Prerequisite: Open to students majoring in science, psychology or departmental approval. Lab Fee Required.

BL 111 - Anatomy and Physiology I

(Credits: 4.00)

This is an introductory course primarily designed for freshman nursing students. It is a foundational course covering the basic structure and function of the human body at various levels, including the cell, the tissue, the organ, and the organ system. A minimal amount of chemistry is covered at the beginning of the course to enhance the student's understanding of the chemical processes underlying cellular function. The focus of this course is normal structure and function; however, some disease states also may be discussed. Laboratory studies using fetal pigs, cadavers, computer simulations and various live animals may be used to supplement the course material. Students who register for this course must also register for lab BL 111L for the same term. Prerequisite: MT 010, open to students majoring in science, psychology or nursing or departmental approval. Lab Fee Required.

BL 112 - Anatomy and Physiology II

(Credits: 4.00)

This course is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. The basic chemistry, cell physiology and histology discussed in the first semester will be applied to the organs and tissues involved in body control, defense, gas exchange, osmolarity, pH and reproduction. As in the first semester, the maintenance of homeostasis is the primary objective. The subject matter concentrates on normal structure and function; however, some disease states also may be discussed. Laboratory studies using fetal pigs, computer simulations and various live animals may be used to supplement the course material. Students who register for this course also must register for lab BL 112L for the same term. Prerequisite: BL 111, open to students majoring in science or nursing or departmental approval. Lab Fee Required.

BL 120 - Concepts of Biology: A Topical Approach

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is designed as a foundation biology core course for the non-majors. This course introduces the students to the study of basic biological principles at all levels from the molecular to the global in a topical approach. The goal of the course is to gain an understanding of biology and its application to humans and society in the context of special topics or themes.

BL 202 - Microbiology

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a general introductory course that deals with the fundamentals of microbiology including morphology, physiology, and ecology of viruses, bacteria, and other major microbial groups. Prerequisite: Chemistry in the last five years or CH 107, CH 113 or CH 114 and one semester of university biology.

BL 203 - Microbiology Laboratory

(Credits: 1.00)

This introductory laboratory course introduces the student to the fundamentals of microbiology including the morphology, physiology, and ecology of viruses, bacteria, and other major groups of microorganisms, using basic laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: Enrolled concurrently with BL 202 or have had BL 202 or equivalent within last three years.. Lab Fee Required.

BL 205 - Cell Culture and Microscope Techniques

(Credits: 2.00)

Students learn basic cell culture techniques, the theory behind the techniques, and the current applications of those techniques in research. The topics that are covered include: aseptic technique, isolation of primary cultures, cell quantification, growth and maintenance of adherent versus suspension cultures, cryopreservation and thawing, and viability and proliferation detection. Students also learn basic microscope techniques including the use of an inverted microscope. Prerequisite: One semester of university-level biology and one semester of university-level chemistry.

BL 206 - Methods in Protein Purification

(Credits: 2.00)

In this laboratory course, students learn common techniques used to effectively separate and isolate proteins. Students examine how to separate proteins via precipitation, centrifugation and chromatography. Electrophoresis is used for both examination and purification of the final product as well as a means of separation. Protein stabilization and quantification techniques are used to analyze the resulting product. Prerequisite: One semester of university-level biology that includes cell structure and function, and one semester of university-level chemistry. Lab Fee Required.

BL 207 - Plant Biology

(Credits: 3.00)

Plant Biology deals with the study of the structure, morphology, physiology and ecology of seed-bearing plants. Emphasis is on the interdependence of all living things and the central role of green plants in this scenario. Prerequisite: Biology within the last five years or departmental approval.

BL 209 - DNA Technology

(Credits: 2.00)

This hands-on course provides basic and practical knowledge on molecular genetics and recombinant DNA technology methods. Students will learn DNA isolations, restriction enzyme digestions, DNA fingerprinting, PCR (polymerase chain reaction), and gene isolation, transformation and expression. Prerequisite: BL 301, BL 306 or BL 308. Lab Fee Required.

BL 210 - Fundamentals of Environmental Science

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a lecture and discussion course for non-science majors that includes a study of the principles of environmental science from the perspective of both biological and physical sciences emphasizing: the interrelationships among all organisms and their natural environments, natural resource management, mineral cycles, various energy sources, toxic and hazardous substances, and waste treatment strategies. Environmental issues and some of the ethical implications of human interaction with the environment are also discussed. This course can be used to fulfill a core requirement in the natural sciences and is cross-listed with CH 210.

BL 212 - Environmental Science for Early Childhood Education

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is designed to introduce the student to fundamental concepts in environmental science and apply them in the classroom setting. The major topics covered are energy, ecosystems, biodiversity, water resources, recycling and sustainable living. Since this course is designed around a series of field experiences, each major topic is initially introduced and discussed in the classroom followed by a related field experience. After the field experience, students are required to summarize, reflect upon, and apply important concepts based upon their experiences. This course is open only to students enrolled in the Early Childhood program.

BL 216 - Steel, Stone, Muscle and Bone

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is designed to be the owner’s manual to the incredible machine that is the human body. The primary objective of this course is to describe and relate physiologically relevant phenomena to the health and well being of the average individual. Intrinsic to this focus is the study of homeostasis, the body's ability to maintain inner peace in the face of a chaotic external environment. The physiology (and anatomy) of the vertebrates (especially humans) will be discussed at various levels including the cell, the tissue, the organ, and the organ system. Topics that will be discussed during the semester include nerves, muscles, bones, circulation, and metabolism. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

BL 217 - The Evolution of Food

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is designed to examine the history of food and its relationship to the human diet. What exactly was the “Paleo” diet and how is it currently interpreted. How much protein is enough? Can you eat too much of a good thing? How is genetic engineering changing the food we eat? Should we be afraid? What exactly is a GMO? Why are so many people moving to gluten-free diets? How has and does diet affect society as we know it? This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

BL 220 - Introduction to Evolutionary Biology

(Credits: 3.00)

This is an introductory science course for the non-major that introduces students to the theory of evolution, the historical foundations of evolutionary biology, the evidence that supports evolution, the role of natural selection and adaptation in the evolutionary process, and the history of life on earth. This course can be used to fulfill a core requirement in the natural sciences.

BL 302 - Bioinformatics

(Credits: 2.00)

This course is a primer on topics related to bioinformatics. This highly interactive course allows students to learn and master various programs and databases used in analyzing DNA and proteins. Practical workshops and projects involve building, characterizing and annotating an unknown sequence. Prerequisite: Molecular biology or equivalent.

BL 306 - Cell Physiology

(Credits: 4.00)

This course explores the structural and molecular organization of the cell as the basis of life processes. Students who register for this course must also register for lab BL 306L for the same term. Prerequisite: BL 105, BL 106, CH 201. Lab Fee Required.

BL 307 - General Physiology

(Credits: 4.00)

This course is an integrated study of the functions of organs and organ systems and their control mechanisms in vertebrate organisms. Students who register for this course must also register for lab BL 307L for the same term. Prerequisite: BL 106, CH 201 or equivalent. Lab Fee Required.

BL 308 - Genetics

(Credits: 4.00)

This course examines the principles, theories and current concepts of heredity, molecular genetics and genomics. Included are modern technologies, genetic manipulation and engineering, and ethical issues that impact society. Prerequisite: BL 306, CH 202. Lab Fee Required.

BL 400 - Independent Study

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Study Prerequisite: Department approval.

BL 401 - Seminar: History and Philosophy of Biology

(Credits: 2.00)

This is a seminar-format course that studies the development of scientific thought in the biological sciences from ancient to present times. Prerequisite: Department approval.

BL 402 - Research Design in the Natural Sciences

(Credits: 1.00)

Students will produce a research proposal on an approved topic of their choice in science. They will participate in reading primary literature, journal-club style presentations, and detailed experimental design culminating in a research proposal. The student's research proposal will be the basis for the culminating research project for the science major capstone project. Cross-listed with CH 402. Prerequisite: Junior standing in biology or departmental approval.

BL 403 - Developmental Biology

(Credits: 4.00)

This course examines how a fertilized egg gives rise to the adult body and how that adult body produces the next generation. Students who register for this course must also register for lab BL 403L for the same term. Prerequisite: BL 306, CH 202 (BL 308 is recommended.). Lab Fee Required.

BL 405 - Immunology

(Credits: 2.00)

This course is an introduction to the current theories and understandings of the human immune system, and its genetics, applications, implications and limitations. Prerequisite: BL 306, CH 202.

BL 406 - Independent Research

(Credits: 1.00 - 2.00)

Students will execute a research project based on an approved research proposal. They will carry out the laboratory work to complete their independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the department or a research scientist off campus. Students must enroll in a total of 2 credits to meet the senior capstone requirement. Cross-listed with CH 406. Prerequisite: BL 402 or department consent; only for science majors or minors. Corequisite: BL 407.

BL 407 - Senior Capstone Seminar

(Credits: 1.00)

This course will prepare students to communicate their research findings in a scientific report format. In this course, students will prepare a written and oral presentation of their completed research project and participate in journal club style presentations. Cross-listed with CH 407. Prerequisite: BL 402. Corequisite: BL 406.

BL 410 - History of Medicine

(Credits: 2.00)

Using a seminar format, students will study the development of the medical sciences through the centuries, including ethical issues related to the medical field. This course is cross-listed with CH 410. Prerequisite: Department approval.

BL 411 - Seminar II: Clinical Experience

(Credits: 2.00)

This course focuses on an internship/clinical experience. One of the goals of this experience is to give the students insight into the academic and practical challenges ahead of them in the pursuit of a career in a health care profession. This course is cross-listed with CH 411. Prerequisite: Junior standing, departmental approval.