English Courses

EN 010 - College Reading, Grammar and Composition

(Credits: 3.00)

A one-semester course providing a study of and practice in the mechanics of English, methods of improving reading and thinking skills, and an introduction to expository writing. The course will prepare students for EN 101. Writing is judged according to standard English. Although assessed for three credits, this course does not carry University credit.

EN 101 - Persuasive Writing

(Credits: 3.00)

The course is the first part of a two-part sequence. The course provides study and practice in rhetoric and essay writing, emphasizing writing as a process of invention, drafting, revising and editing. The main goal of the course is to encourage good habits of writing for students' lives in and out of college. Effective reading strategies and critical thinking skills are also key components of the course. Standard English is required. (In order to receive CLEP credit for EN 101, students must achieve a normed ''B'' on the CLEP exam.)

EN 102 - Research Writing

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is the second part of a two-part sequence. The course will build on the writing, reading and critical thinking skills begun in EN 101. Students also will study and practice primary and/or secondary research, incorporating the results of the research into their papers. Standard English is required. No CLEP or AP credit will be given for EN 102. Prerequisite: EN 101.

EN 150 - Introduction to Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This is an introduction to the techniques of analyzing primarily fiction, poetry and drama; the nature of interpretation; and the connections between literature and the human condition. The course involves writing about literature and increasing one's enjoyment of reading. Prerequisite: EN 102.

EN 200 - Autobiography and Life Stories: Reading, Responding, Writing

(Credits: 3.00)

Students engage collaboratively with each other and various authors in a "critical community," working toward enlightenment of self through writing and interpreting autobiography. Corequisite: ECUE 200, ECUE 201, ECUE 301.

EN 201 - Configurations of Families

(Credits: 3.00)

This course examines the ways in which literature reflects human relationships, which in turn allows students to reflect on their own culturally-shaped conceptions of love and family. Content and pedagogy will be integrated by providing students with an opportunity to develop and use literary analysis as a means of understanding culture and connecting to literature. Corequisite: ECUE 291, EDUC 398, MT 105.

EN 205 - Selected Topics

(Credits: 3.00)

A study of a specific theme, category, or historical period of literature. Prerequisite: EN 150.

EN 207 - Linguistics and Writing

(Credits: 3.00)

This course provides students with an understanding of linguistics to underpin the teaching of writing and language arts. The course encompasses introductory elements of linguistics, such as the history of the English language, syntax, language acquisition, dialects, and bilingualism, and emphasizes the pedagogical application of these concepts. Additionally, the course prepares students to teach basic writing skills, such as grammar and sentence structure, to beginning writers. Prerequisite: EN 101.

EN 208 - Creative Writing

(Credits: 3.00)

This course offers students practice in writing and revising fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. It helps students understand the vital connection between reading and writing. It also provides strategies for teaching creative writing for pre-service English teachers. Prerequisite: EN 150.

EN 211 - Ethnicity in American Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of American writers of diverse ethnic backgrounds (including, but not limited to, Native, African, Asian, Hispanic and European Americans) and of how ethnicity plays a role in the themes, structures, and genres of literature. Various historical periods may be considered. Aesthetic, historical, cultural, and gender issues will be explored.

EN 213 - African American Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This course includes a sampling of autobiographies, poetry, fiction, and drama written by African Americans, with some emphasis on the Harlem Literary Renaissance and its effect on contemporary writers. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

EN 214 - Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This course explores science fiction and/or fantasy literature from various periods and countries. The readings may explore issues such as utopias, alternate worlds, environmentalism, and gender roles, among others.

EN 215 - Irish Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will focus on and illuminate the extraordinary voices of Irish writers from 1900 to the present. Assigned readings will analyze and celebrate writers of genius and courage. The course includes an optional seven-day trip to Ireland.

EN 216 - The Graphic Novel as Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This course introduces an important and relatively recent strand of graphic storytelling: the graphic novel. Students explore the relationship between form and content in each graphic novel, and the way in which each text raises larger questions about the nature and limits of representation.

EN 218 - Faith and Film

(Credits: 3.00)

This course gives students the opportunity to study multiple themes regarding faith as expressed and dramatized in film. Questions of faith will be explored both in religion and also in institutions, relationships, self, progress, and more. Themes and assigned films vary from year to year, but the course will include at least one film that is by or about St. Francis of Assisi. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

EN 219 - Reading Film

(Credits: 3.00)

Reading Film introduces students to filmmaking, film narrative, film form, and film technique. Focusing on English-language narrative film, the course teaches students about major directors and films, genres of film, and film analysis.

EN 220 - Literature and the Environment

(Credits: 3.00)

This course introduces students to literary and critical texts that examine the relationship between humankind and the natural world. Students study ideas surrounding nature, such as notions of wilderness, the frontier, pastoralism, and environmental activism. The course reading list primarily represents texts from the 19th century to the present day and covers a range of genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction and film.

EN 228 - Business Writing

(Credits: 3.00)

This course stresses the rhetoric of business writing and focuses not only on the writing of reports, letters, memos, summaries, and proposals but also on the use of research related to the student's major interest. This course also is listed under BU 228. Prerequisite: EN 102.

EN 230 - British Literature I: Epic Warriors and Romantic Heroes

(Credits: 3.00)

A survey of literature from the Anglo-Saxon, medieval, and Renaissance periods.

EN 235 - British Literature II: Revolution and Romanticism

(Credits: 3.00)

This course familiarizes students with the dynamic nature of British literary and cultural history from the late 17th until the 20th centuries -- conversations and conflicts among writers, sometimes across periods, as they attempted to define themselves by extending or rebelling against other writers, and the shifting, complicated relationship between cultural context and literature. Along the way, the course provides a "cultural literacy" -- recognition of basic names and concepts that are a part of the field. Second, it focuses on themes that are central to the literature of these periods and that are continually reconsidered, revised and reworked from period to period: questions of race, class, and gender as well as questions of nationality.

EN 243 - Images of Women in Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of late 19th-, 20th- and/or 21st-century literature by women, which explores literature about the causes and effects of changing roles for women; the quest for a new identity; new options for family, career, and lifestyle; and new expectations for men and women. The course also examines the continuing backlash against changing roles for women.

EN 249 - American Literature I: Resistance and Rebellion

(Credits: 3.00)

A survey of American writers to 1865. Challenges to traditional conceptions of canon and periods may be included.

EN 250 - American Literature II: Identity and the Emerging Empire

(Credits: 3.00)

A survey of American writers from 1865 to 1945. Challenges to traditional conceptions of canon and periods may be included.

EN 303 - Studies in Non-Western Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This course introduces students to the literature of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, the Subcontinent and Latin America. Students will consider aesthetic, social, and historical issues with each work. Themes and assigned works will vary from year to year, e.g., postcolonial literature. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

EN 304 - Studies in Western Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This course introduces students to the poetry, drama, and fiction of Europe. Topics for study might include classics of Western Civilization, 20th-Century works by non-English European writers, literature produced by the European colonies, or the literature of war. Themes and assigned works vary from year to year. Please check with the English and Writing Department for a particular semester's course description.

EN 306 - American Literature II

(Credits: 3.00)

A survey of American writers from 1865 to 1945. Challenges to traditional conceptions of canon and periods may be included.

EN 307 - Writing and Activism

(Credits: 3.00)

This course explores writing as a political act through an examination of short stories, poems, essays, speeches, and other literary works that focus on activism (e.g., environment, gender inequality, racism, criminal behavior, terrorism, and war). In this course, students will study the tools that writers use to compel readers to action and will consider best practices for literary advocacy and social/political persuasion and instruction. Students will complete varied writing assignments, including critiques, rhetorical analyses, and creative prompts. The course aims to improve students’ dexterity with written persuasion as a means of challenging injustice both locally and worldwide. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

EN 308 - Digital Witness: Capturing Lives and Telling Stories

(Credits: 3.00)

We live fast lives, at times at the expense of recognizing the diverse communities around us. This course affords students the opportunity to connect with their street, their neighbors, their neighborhood, their city. Through engagement with a variety of digital modes, students will understand the principles of interviewing and storytelling, foster communication skills, and enhance their creative acumen. Students will produce a variety of written assignments infused with digital components, culminating in a longer piece involving experiential learning and/or cultural immersion. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

EN 309 - From Homer to Hip Hop: Poetry and Song

(Credits: 3.00)

Poetry and song are artistic cousins: both are performative arts designed to bring people together in celebration and sorrow, to enact social change, and to convey local and national tradition, mythology, and morals. In this course, students will both read poetry and listen to music and examine how these art forms have affected social discourse and norms from ancient to modern times. Special attention will be paid to how musical elements of poetry and song, such as rhythm, rhyme, and melody work to enhance thematic components of the art. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

EN 315 - Poetry Workshop

(Credits: 3.00)

This course offers students the chance to learn techniques for writing and revising poetry. Students will discuss selected readings and prepare portfolios of their work. The course may include opportunities for attending literary events. Course content varies from year to year. Students can repeat once for a total of six credits. Prerequisite: EN 208 or consent of instructor.

EN 316 - Fiction Workshop

(Credits: 3.00)

This course offers students the chance to learn techniques for writing and revising fiction. Students will discuss selected readings and prepare portfolios of their work. The course may include opportunities for attending literary events. Course content varies from year to year. Students can repeat once for a total of six credits. Prerequisite: EN 208 or consent of instructor.

EN 317 - Nonfiction Workshop

(Credits: 3.00)

This course offers students practice in rhetorical and expressive writing, with an emphasis on developing an awareness of style. Students critique their own essays and the essays of their peers, and students prepare a portfolio of writing. Political Communication majors have the option of directing at least one major assignment toward their major. Pre-service English elementary or secondary teachers discuss selected readings and issues connected to the teaching of writing. Prerequisite: EN 102.

EN 318 - Screenwriting Workshop

(Credits: 3.00)

This course offers students the opportunity to learn techniques for writing and revising screenplays. Students will study format, story structure, character, dialogue, and cinematic method as they pertain to modern screenwriting. They will also learn principles of analysis that enable them to critique their own work and the work of others. Course content varies from year to year. Students can repeat once for a total of six credits.

EN 319 - Special Topics

(Credits: 3.00)

This course focuses on the study of a specific genre, category, or style of creative writing.

EN 325 - Shakespeare

(Credits: 3.00)

This course explores the life, times and work of William Shakespeare, including the development of the Elizabethan theater. Students gain the skills needed to read the texts accurately and be fully conversant with the fundamentals of Shakespeare, including the major themes and narratives of his plays and poems, early English staging, the main issues of textual transmission, and the facts surrounding the life of the author. Various plays including comedies, tragedies and histories are read (at the instructor's discretion).

EN 333 - Contemporary Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is a study of literature in English from 1945 to the present with an emphasis on themes particularly relevant to our age. Themes and assigned works will vary from year to year.

EN 335 - British Literature II: Restoration to the Twentieth Century

(Credits: 3.00)

This course familiarizes students with the dynamic nature of British literary and cultural history from the late 17th until the 20th centuries -- conversations and conflicts among writers, sometimes across periods, as they attempted to define themselves by extending or rebelling against other writers, and the shifting, complicated relationship between cultural context and literature. Along the way, the course provides a "cultural literacy" -- recognition of basic names and concepts that are a part of the field. Second, it focuses on themes that are central to the literature of these periods and that are continually reconsidered, revised and reworked from period to period: questions of race, class, and gender as well as questions of nationality.

EN 340 - Modernism

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a survey of major English, American, Scottish, Irish and Welsh writings from 1900 to 1945 that individually and together define what has been termed "Modernism," a literary movement. In this course, a major emphasis is on artistic innovations of style and content, thematic concerns, and literary/aesthetic theories.

EN 400 - Internship

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

This practicum (internship) for non-teaching Writing and/or English majors will give students the opportunity to work in areas relating to their vocational interests. Credits will be arranged with the director of the practicum, though the credit limit per internship will be three credits. The total number of credits earned over a four-year period may not exceed eight. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of department chair.

EN 402 - English Senior Seminar

(Credits: 3.00)

A culmination of the undergraduate major's preparation in English, this course requires each student to do extensive, independent research and write an individual project. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of department chair.

EN 403 - Practicum: Producing a Literary Magazine

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

This is a forum for the production of the literary magazine. The course introduces students to the various aspects of publishing, editing, correspondence, layout, and production. Students can repeat once for a total of six credits.

EN 405 - Images of Women in Film

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is an introduction to the depiction of women in Hollywood films from the 1920s to the present from the critical perspective of feminist film theory. Particular emphasis is placed on major women directors, writers and other artists who have contributed significantly to the development of film art. This course includes the viewing of representative films. This course also is listed under ART 415.

EN 412 - Literary Theory

(Credits: 3.00)

This course involves the study of major critical theories and the application of these theories to specific literary texts. This course does not fulfill the core requirement in literature. Prerequisite: Junior standing in English major or minor or Writing major.

EN 415 - Writing Senior Seminar

(Credits: 3.00)

This workshop will build on the techniques introduced in Poetry Workshop (EN 315), Fiction Workshop (EN 316), Nonfiction Workshop ( EN 317), and Screenwriting Workshop (EN 318). This capstone course focuses on the production and revision of new creative works as well as the intensive revision of student portfolios from previous writing courses. This course also includes preparation for a public reading of student work on campus prior to graduation. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Writing major.

EN 430 - Studies in Chaucer

(Credits: 3.00)

A study of selected works of Chaucer. Some readings will be in Middle English.

EN 431 - Studies in Satire

(Credits: 3.00)

This course focuses on the study of the influence and impact of satire in literature and culture.

EN 432 - Studies in Romantic and Victorian Literature

(Credits: 3.00)

This is an in-depth study of particular authors, genres, or themes in 19th century British literature.