Course Descriptions

HS 101 - The United States to 1877

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is a study of the building of the United States and its political, social, cultural, economic and religious institutions from colonial times through the Reconstruction period, including a special study of the foundations of American government at all levels. This is for teacher preparation. Prerequisite: For teacher preparation/elementary education majors only; department chair approval need for non-elementary education majors.

HS 102 - The United States Since 1877

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a continuation of HS 101, presenting the development of the people and institutions of the United States (including state, local and national government) from the period of Reconstruction to the present. For teacher preparation and elementary education majors only. Prerequisite: For teacher preparation/elementary education majors only; department chair approval need for non-elementary education majors.

HS 103 - Ancient Civilization to 476 A.D.

(Credits: 3.00)

This course focuses on the history of ancient world civilizations, Western and non-Western, and their impact on the development of the Western world, giving attention to their respective peoples and cultures.

HS 104 - Medieval Civilization 476-1500 A.D.

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of medieval civilization from the breakup of the Roman Empire to the dawn of the Renaissance. Students will examine the interrelationship of economic, political, cultural, social, and religious factors in the development of newly forming kingdoms and the role of the church and ambitions in this process.

HS 105 - World Civilization

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a survey course of global history, giving a brief overview of the significant political, economic, social and cultural developments. Emphasis is placed upon intercultural relationships and interdependence. Prerequisite: For teacher preparation/elementary education majors only; department chair approval need for non-elementary education majors.

HS 126 - Survey of American History

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is a study of the building of the United States and its political, social, cultural, economic and religious institutions from colonial times to the present.

HS 127 - World Cultures and Communities

(Credits: 3.00)

This survey course on global history focuses on the formation of culture and communities by giving a brief overview of the significant political, economic, social and cultural developments starting with prehistory and ending in the 20th century. Corequisite: ECUE 280, ECUE 281, ECUE 381.

HS 201 - Early Modern Civilization 1500-1815

(Credits: 3.00)

This covers the history of the development of nation states from the time of the late Renaissance to the end of the Napoleonic era. Special emphasis is given to the Western world, though all regions are covered.

HS 202 - Modern Civilization, 1815-Present

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of global development in the eras of nationalism, colonialism, totalitarianism and contemporary revolution of the 19th and 20th centuries.

HS 205 - Selected Topics

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

This course features the study of a special historical topic or time period.

HS 207 - Introduction to Women's History

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a global survey of women's contributions to society, as well as to the economy, government, religion and the family from ancient to modern times.

HS 208 - Church and State

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of 20 centuries of struggle between institutionalized religion and the State. Emphasis is given to the impact of religion (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) on political and social institutions and vice versa. This is also listed under REL 208.

HS 209 - Introduction to the History of the World's Religions

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will introduce the student to the histories of the major religious traditions that have had a significant impact on the world state. Included are the histories of these traditions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The historical expressions of compassion (and its all-too-frequent absence) will provide an additional framework to view the impact of these traditions on the world. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent
.

HS 214 - African-American History

(Credits: 3.00)

This course traces African-American history from the West African traditions through the slave trade, slavery and emancipation, the rise of the Jim Crow system, the migration north, and the civil rights and self-determinist struggles of recent years. Special emphasis is placed on the various means African-Americans have used to achieve freedom, equality and power in America.

HS 215 - Building of America: The Story of the American People

(Credits: 3.00)

The course will examine the United States’ past through the lens of social history. The class will examine how a diverse group of people come together to form a new nation and a concentrate on common people’s contributions to building the United States. It will also examine the issues of race, class, and gender in American history.

HS 223 - Renaissance and Reformation

(Credits: 3.00)

This period marked a crucial transition between the medieval and modern worlds in Christendom from 1300-1648. This course focuses on the political, social, intellectual, cultural, and religious movements of the era. Cross-listed with REL 223.

HS 241 - Colonial and Revolutionary America

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of the colonial and revolutionary growth of the people who would become Americans. Special emphasis is placed on how they slowly differentiated themselves from the Old World cultural patterns while remaining Western. Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken HS 101..

HS 242 - Civil War and Reconstruction

(Credits: 3.00)

This is an in-depth course stressing the rise of Jacksonian democracy and the market revolution; the causes and conduct of the war; the human, political and economic problems of the Confederacy; and the Reconstruction era. Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken HS 101..

HS 243 - Twentieth Century America

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of the most recent developments in American history, from the Gilded Age on, with emphasis on industrialization, the struggle between isolation and foreign involvement as the nation becomes a world power, and internal problems. Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken HS 102..

HS 261 - Intercultural History: Africa

(Credits: 3.00)

Starting with the origins of man, this course focuses on the rich history of Africa. Students will learn the great diversity of this continent and its role in the history of many empires and nations. Special emphasis is given to the great early civilizations of Egypt; the great western empires of Mali, Ghana and Songhai; the introduction of Islam and, later, slavery; the impact of colonization and, finally, independence. While this course is lecture driven, there are ample opportunities for students to interact with one another and engage the past through primary sources, films, and secondary readings.

HS 262 - Intercultural History: East Asia

(Credits: 3.00)

This course focuses on Modern History of East Asia concentrating on China and Japan. It examines both the internal or domestic history of each nation and the interactions between East and West, particularly focusing on interactions among the United States and China and Japan. While this course is lecture driven, there are ample opportunities for students to interact with one another and engage the past through primary sources, films, and secondary readings.

HS 263 - Intercultural History: Latin America

(Credits: 3.00)

A study of the history and development of Latin America as a region, this course starts with the early pre-Western civilizations and moves through the impact of Columbus’ “discovery,” the development of various regions under European rule, and, ultimately, independence. While this course is lecture driven, there are ample opportunities for students to interact with one another and engage the past through primary sources, films, and secondary readings. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent
.

HS 264 - Intercultural History: Middle East

(Credits: 3.00)

This course surveys the social, political, economic and religious history of the Middle East. It examines both the evolution of the region from dynastic and religious empires to modern states and the region's interactions with the West and other civilizations. While this course is lecture driven, there are ample opportunities for students to interact with one another and engage the past through primary sources, films, and secondary readings.

HS 265 - Intercultural History: Russia

(Credits: 3.00)

This course traces Russia from the Kievan period to the post-communist era. It explores the remarkable story of how numerous ethnic groups in an immense area and a daunting climate forge a powerful nation with rich cultural traditions under the leadership of such historic figures as the “Greats” – Peter and Catherine, as well as Ivan, Lenin, Stalin and Gorbachev.

HS 266 - Intercultural History: India and South Asia

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course, students explore the history of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka as well as several smaller countries of the region. Special attention is paid to the development of political and economic systems as well as the role of colonialism, politics, religions, languages, and ethnic and territorial conflicts in the region.

HS 302 - The History of American Women

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of the varied historical experiences of American women including women's contributions to the family, politics, social movements and their own lives.

HS 303 - History of Modern American Women

(Credits: 3.00)

This course features the varied historical experience of American women beginning in the mid 19th century. Women's roles, their political, social, economic and medical contributions as well as the reform movements they advocated and opposed will be part of this examination.

HS 304 - The Tumultuous 1960s

(Credits: 3.00)

This course covers the years 1946 to 1980, with emphasis on the 1960s decade. The class delves into the events and issues that led up to the 1960s, such as the rights and protest movements as well as the ramification of these and other events and ideas. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or greater.

HS 305 - Growing Up and Youth Rebellion

(Credits: 3.00)

This course introduces students to the exciting new field of children's history by examining the changing concept of childhood and girls' and boys' experiences in American history. It also concentrates on the growing role of the state in child rearing through public schools, welfare, and other governmental programs.

HS 306 - American Social and Religious Movements

(Credits: 3.00)

he course will examine the important role social and religious movements played in defining the United States. It will focus on the causes, goals, and results of reform, peace, religious and other social movements and the role of these movements played in public policy debates. The course will also examine how religion and other ideologies were used to exclude and isolate Americans from the broader society. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent
.

HS 307 - The Presidency

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is a study of the American presidency. The course examines the historical development of the presidency as an institution. In addition, the course allows for case studies of individual U.S. presidents, including analysis of the influence of presidents domestically and internationally. This is also listed under POLS 307.

HS 318 - Intercultural History: Africa

(Credits: 3.00)

Starting with the origins of man, this course focuses on the rich history of Africa. Students will learn the great diversity of this continent and its role in the history of many empires and nations. Special emphasis is given to the great early civilizations of Egypt; the great western empires of Mali, Ghana and Songhai; the introduction of Islam and, later, slavery; the impact of colonization and, finally, independence. While this course is lecture driven, there are ample opportunities for students to interact with one another and engage the past through primary sources, films, and secondary readings.

HS 340 - Constitutional History

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is a study of the United States Constitution and its influence on American society historically and in the present. The course focuses on the crafting and development of the Constitution, and on the important role of the courts in interpreting its provisions. Special attention is devoted to current constitutional controversies. This is also listed under POLS 340.

HS 341 - U.S. Foreign Policy

(Credits: 3.00)

The course includes an analysis of the historical development of foreign policy in the United States. In addition, the course focuses on important players in the foreign policy process, including government leaders, news media, and the public. Special attention is devoted to key foreign policy issues including the Cold War, weapons of mass destruction, human rights, and international terrorism. This is also listed under POLS 341. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

HS 400 - Independent Study

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

This includes practica and internships, to be arranged with the department chair.

HS 402 - Seminar: Introduction to Research

(Credits: 2.00 - 3.00)

This research course is designed to demonstrate the students' grasp of research techniques and historical method, and their creative and analytical abilities when dealing with historical sources. Prerequisite: Upper class standing or consent of instructor.

HS 403 - Public History Internship

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

This class provides professional experience at a museum, historical society, archive or other public history institution. The student will work in the institution to gain experience in the profession and valuable skills. Prerequisite: History or Broad Field Social Studies Major or Minor with a sophomore standing..

HS 405 - Introduction to Public History

(Credits: 3.00)

This course introduces students to the history, philosophy, ethics and organization of the public history profession. Using numerous hands-on activities students also will be exposed to basic public history practices and projects. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or instructor approval.

POLS 102 - American Government

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course students are introduced to the fundamentals of federal, state, and local government in the United States, with emphasis on how political, social and human values are expressed in our political system. Students will examine both the institutions and participants crucial to democratic government in the United States.

POLS 201 - Comparative Politics

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is a survey of the different systems countries use to govern themselves. In addition to examining specific governments, students will analyze topics such as political freedoms, economic development, and national identity. Special attention is given to challenges facing different regions of the world including poverty, war, health care, and human rights.

POLS 203 - An Introduction to Legal Systems

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course students are introduced to law and legal systems with emphasis on how the principles and applications of civil and criminal law affect citizens. Areas of focus include family law, juvenile proceedings, and business and consumer law.

POLS 205 - Selected Topics

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course students will explore and reflect on issues underlying political events and the current political environment. Recent offerings have included the politics of race and ethnicity, and international terrorism.

POLS 206 - International Relations

(Credits: 3.00)

Students will examine how nations interact in a complex, interdependent world. Topics include globalization, diplomacy, security, conflict resolution, economics, international law, human rights, terrorism, and the environment.

POLS 210 - Model United Nations

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

In this course, students will study the history, organization and structure of the United Nations, and the history, economy, government and foreign policy of a particular country. Students will meet once a week for one hour and participate as a club in University and community events. Course may be taken more than once for a total of four credits.

POLS 212 - Women in American Politics

(Credits: 3.00)

Students will explore the origins and history of women's roles as voters, candidates, activists and officeholders in U.S. politics and government. In addition, the course addresses issues that may affect men and women differently, including education, health care and reproduction, service in the military, and family law.

POLS 215 - International Security and Weapons of Mass Destruction

(Credits: 3.00)

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) play a pivotal role in how we define, understand and promote international security. In this course, students will examine the history, development and proliferation of these devastating weapons; the moral, physical and psychological implications of using them; and their impact on security around the globe.

POLS 220 - International Human Rights

(Credits: 3.00)

Students will examine the history and moral bases of human rights, international efforts to construct norms, treaties, and enforcement measures. Students will analyze the role of human rights in the context of international relations and current human rights violations including human trafficking, torture and genocide.

POLS 221 - Human Trafficking Law, Policy and Politics

(Credits: 3.00)

This course will study the issues of human trafficking and contemporary slavery. We will track developments in international, regional, and state law and policy to understand the emergence of an international anti-trafficking regime. We will evaluate the successes and failures of such a regime and identify areas it can be developed. We will then turn to look at specific cases of trafficking and slavery, examining how individuals interact with law and policy taking into account global structural conditions that sustain trafficking, slavery, and other forms of transnational crime. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department approval.

POLS 303 - The Law in American Politics

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course, students will study the American judicial system and its role in U.S. politics. Students will explore the structure of the federal court system and the political battles from Wisconsin and the Midwest to Washington. Students also will examine the roles of participants in the judicial system, including judges, lawyers, interest groups and the public.

POLS 304 - Political Battles from Wisconsin to Washington

(Credits: 3.00)

Congress is crucial to U.S. democracy since it represents the will of the people. In this course, students will examine the U.S. Congress as an institution and its roles in lawmaking and representation, incorporating both state and federal influences on this body.

POLS 305 - Justice and Power

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course, students explore the foundations of politics by studying the fundamental works of political philosophy. Special attention is paid to understanding the foundations of American political thought.

POLS 306 - Political Parties and Interest Groups

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course, students examine the variety of ways in which people participate in the political system, including through voting and lobbying, the important roles of political parties and interest groups, as well as unconventional forms of participation such as protests and civil disobedience.

POLS 307 - The Presidency

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is a study of the American presidency. Students will examine the historical development of the presidency as an institution. The class also addresses the relationship between the presidency and other branches of government. In addition, students will analyze presidential decision making through case studies of individual presidents, and consider the influence of the U.S. president domestically and internationally. This is also listed under HS 307.

POLS 312 - Geopolitics

(Credits: 3.00)

This is a study of the relationship between political phenomena and the physical and cultural environment. This is also listed under GE 312.

POLS 314 - Latin American Politics

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course, students will survey the governments and politics of the nations of Latin America. Topics include the impact of the drug trade, foreign policy, European colonization, revolution, economic development, the military in politics, and human rights. Students will choose a country of interest and follow its current events throughout the semester.

POLS 315 - China and East Asian Politics

(Credits: 3.00)

Students will examine the governments and politics of China and East Asian countries. Students will analyze the different forms of government in these countries, as well as their economic development and foreign policy. Special attention will be given to nuclear proliferation, struggles for democracy, and human rights.

POLS 316 - Middle Eastern Politics

(Credits: 3.00)

This course is an introduction to the politics of the Middle East. Students will examine the central issues of the region including influences on regional conflict, the relationship between Islam and government, and different forms of government. Special attention is given to the rights of women and minority groups.

POLS 320 - Global Political Economy

(Credits: 3.00)

Students will be introduced to the pivotal importance of economics and the interdisciplinary complexity of international affairs. Students will explore the interaction of politics and economics against a diverse historical and theoretical backdrop. Special attention is paid to contemporary political and economic issues, particularly from the perspective of decision makers, both private and governmental, who play important roles in the international system.

POLS 340 - Constitutional History

(Credits: 3.00)

In this course, students will explore the foundations of American liberty and related political institutions. Students will study the influence of the U.S. Constitution on society throughout American history. Students will examine the political and cultural environment of the founding, the crafting and development of the Constitution, and the role of the courts in interpreting and shaping our understanding of the Constitution. This course is also listed under HS 340.

POLS 341 - U.S. Foreign Policy

(Credits: 3.00)

The course includes an analysis of the historical development of foreign policy in the United States. In addition, the course focuses on important players in the foreign policy process, including government leaders, news media, and the public. Special attention is devoted to key foreign policy issues including the Cold War, weapons of mass destruction, human rights, and international terrorism. This is also listed under HS 341. This course may be used toward an advanced core certificate. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or department consent.

POLS 400 - Independent Study

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

This includes practica and internships to be arranged with the department adviser.

POLS 401 - Seminar

(Credits: 3.00)

As a culminating experience, this course requires students to craft a formal academic research paper. Students will choose a topic of interest, review the relevant literature, and develop a research design to contribute to further understanding of the topic. Students will conduct original research and present their findings to faculty, students and family members. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

POLS 402 - Political Internship

(Credits: 3.00)

The primary purpose of the internship is to assist students in preparing for the next step in their professional development. The internship allows students to gain valuable experience while sampling potential career opportunities and building relationships with members of their communities. Students will work individually with a faculty adviser to design an internship tailored to the students' needs and interests. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.