Course Descriptions

ED 700 - Doctoral Seminar

(Credits: 1.00)

Students are oriented to the doctoral program and to the four major strands of study: leadership, learning, service, and research, and explore their current beliefs and understandings about each strand. Through reading, reflection, and dialogue, students begin to create an Individual Plan of Scholarship for their doctoral studies, with an emphasis on leadership development. The plan emanates from their analysis of the discrepancy between what they know and what they want to learn in the areas of leadership, learning, service, and research based on program outcomes and performance indicators for their doctoral study. Further, the orientation seminar engages students in several opportunities to learn about: study team formation, small group presentations, leadership styles, practica requirements, mentoring, use of technology, University library resources, and other program policies and procedures.

ED 701 - Seminar in Leading a Learning Organization

(Credits: 1.00)

With perspective of the relationship of learning to the continuing evolution of the human experience, this seminar introduces a curriculum sequence that focuses on the nature and nurture of intelligence in individuals and organizations. The goal of this learning strand of the doctoral curriculum is to advance knowledge, skills and dispositions that are important to the cultivation of intelligent behavior in individuals and groups – and thereby organizational empowerment and transformation. To that end, the Year Two curriculum explores applicable research and theory about practices that promote productive learning and achievement across diverse organizational contexts. The Year Two curriculum also focuses student inquiry on the development of a dissertation research proposal.

ED 702 - Seminar in Leading to Serve

(Credits: 1.00)

The curriculum for the Service Year aims to provide a base from which to critically and comprehensively examine important issues, and effectively catalyze long-term, systemic transformation. Four major components provide the overall structure for the Service Year curriculum. Parameters of Service defines service through multiple lenses: academic, sociocultural, individual psychology, and behavior. Application of Service focuses on the fundamental activities of applied, pragmatic service, particularly focusing on the emerging role of technology. Nurturing Service builds on application, examining how applied service can be infused to effect transformational change in individuals, organizations and society. Lastly, Service Future integrates service with leadership, learning, and scholarship to provide a base from which to mindfully assess the present and effectively plan the future.

The Seminar in Leading to Serve focuses on helping students define service through an examination of multiple perspectives and models of service, historic and present day. Students will explore and assess varying purposes, models, and types of service, while learning the language of service from these varying perspectives. From this exploration students will derive their own personal philosophy of service. An additional long-term aim of the seminar is to position students to be mindful of the various present-day, service-related issues; assess their personal talents, resources and plans for service; and make an informed choice about which issue they choose to explore throughout the service year.

ED 710 - Leadership Theory: Evolution and Influences

(Credits: 4.00)

This course traces leadership theory historically and philosophically by examining major theorists, models and historical contexts. It analyzes leadership problems, issues and theories from the past and present. While examining leadership theory, students explore their own formation (where did I come from?), values (what do I value?) and behavior in their organizational context (where am I now?), and construct a personal theory of leadership (where am I going as a leader?) that is informed by their background and formation and incorporates feedback from others about their leadership behavior.

ED 714 - Dimensions of Leadership

(Credits: 4.00)

This seminar explores the moral and ethical dimensions of leadership values and behaviors that engage and empower organizational transformation and achievement of significant moral purpose. Students will identify moral and ethical leadership constructs and behaviors as articulated in research, theory, philosophy, literature, art, exemplars, and practice. Specifically, seminar participants will examine leadership standards and strategies that influence organizational character, moral purpose, and service to the greater community. Accordingly, the nature of leadership will be interpreted in relationship to service that benefits others. Finally, students will articulate their moral purpose as a leader in present and /or anticipated leadership roles within an organization and/or community.

ED 720 - Learning Theory: Evolution and Influences

(Credits: 4.00)

The learning strand of the Doctorate in Leadership for the Advancement of Learning and Service curriculum addresses the nature and nurture of intelligence in individuals and organizations. The ED 720-724 seminar sequence investigates the knowledge base about leadership and learning with a focus on how organizational intelligence is nurtured toward growth and achievement in human systems. The ED 720 seminar traces learning research and theory in the context of social, political, economic, and cultural influences. Students will engage the knowledge base about human intelligence to construct theoretical and practical frameworks that align leadership behavior to the nature and nuture of learning in individuals and organizations. This focus will be complemented in the following ED 724 seminar by examination of leadership behaviors that effectively engage and empower learning organizations to envision and reach their desired outcome.

ED 724 - Dimensions of Leading the Learning Organization

(Credits: 4.00)

The learning strand of the Doctorate in Leadership for the Advancement of Learning and Service curriculum addresses the nature and nurture of intelligence in individuals and organizations. To that end, the 720-724 seminar sequence investigates the interrelated knowledge base about leadership and learning. The curriculum focus is the role of leadership in creating learning organizations that nurture human capacity for growth and achievement. The essential questions to be answered through seminar activities and assignments are:

ED 720 What is the nature of learning in individuals and organizations and the relationships thereof to leadership and service?

ED 724 What are the dimensions of leading learning organizations?
• What is the relationship between leadership, learning and the achievement of organizational purpose/service?
• What strategies and practices nurture organizational capacity for achieving purpose/service?
The ED 724 seminar will also build on ED 714 seminar content in exploring the moral dimensions of leading learning organizations. Students will examine strategies and practices that facilitate: a) development of common vision and commitment in organizations and, b) productive action toward the achievement of compelling purpose. Leadership influence on organizational capacity for learning and achievement will be emphasized.

ED 730 - Service Theory: Evolution and Influences

(Credits: 4.00)

The curriculum for the Service Year aims to provide a base from which to critically and comprehensively examine important issues, and effectively catalyze long-term, systemic transformation. Four major components provide the overall structure for the Service Year curriculum.
• Parameters of Service defines service through multiple lenses – academic, sociocultural, individual psychology and behavior.
• Application of Service focuses on the fundamental activities of applied, pragmatic service
• Transformational Service builds on application, examining how applied service can be infused to effect transformational change in individuals, organizations, and society.
• Service Future integrates service with leadership, learning, and scholarship to provide a base from which to mindfully assess the present and effectively articulate a transformational plan the future.

Utilizing these four components, students will continuously develop a philosophy of service.
• Students will choose a specific issue (individually or as partners) to explore through in-depth interviews, first-hand observation and analysis of root causes by investigating the history of the issue. The issue is then critically analyzed using the information provided through each of the four components of the course. Reflection, personal stories, and real-world experiences drive the formation of the students' philosophy and subsequent analysis of service and their specific issue. Emphasis for the analysis is placed on the parameters, that is, on breadth of sources, accuracy and primacy of sources, and depth of analysis. The analysis is then shared with the class at the end of the first semester.
• Students explore issues of social justice, power and hegemony through the exploration of an “ism.” The ism is a case study that likewise employs interviews, observations and readings about theory and research related to the “ism.” The ism is also explored via the major components of service, analyzed and presented to the class for discussion and amplification of underlying issues of social justice as they relate to leadership, learning and service.

ED 734 - Dimensions of Leading to Serve

(Credits: 4.00)

Transformational leaders possess a developed philosophy of service, the ability to critically and comprehensively examine important issues, and the motivation to effectively catalyze long-term, systemic transformation. The curriculum for the Service Year aims to provide a base from which students can develop the components necessary for transformational leadership. Four major components provide the overall structure for the Service Year curriculum. Parameters of Service defines service through multiple lenses – academic, sociocultural, and individual psychology and behavior. Application of Service focuses on the fundamental activities of applied, pragmatic service, particularly focusing on the emerging role of technology. Nurturing Service builds on application, examining how applied service can be infused to effect transformational change in individuals, organizations, and society. Lastly, Service for Transformation integrates service with leadership, learning, and scholarship to provide a base from which to mindfully assess the present and effectively plan the future – personally, organizationally, and globally. The second semester of the Service Year requires students to continue their investigation of a specific issue, as well as apply their developing critical analysis skills. Building on the analysis of parameters, students will focus on synthesis and application, creating action plans for personal and organizational transformation. Students will be asked to construct an innovative process to communicate their issue in a manner that effectively enables other students in the class to assume a particular perspective relative, and relevant, to the issue. Simultaneously, students in the class will apply their service-analysis paradigm to critique and discuss presented issues. The second semester culminates in activities designed to help students integrate service with leadership, learning, and scholarship, as well as plan future application of these skills. This is summarized in a final integrative product – the Plan for Transformation.

ED 740 - Research Seminar A

(Credits: 3.00)

This seminar reviews the elements of research design that apply to qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. It exposes the student to: qualitative research designs such as case study research and ethnographic research; historical research; non-experimental quantitative research such as survey research, longitudinal research, correlational research, and experimental research designs. The seminar emphasizes the basics of research planning and design using descriptive methodologies in a practicum setting. The ethics of doing good research are covered in this course. Simulations and pilot studies in research are used as a springboard to provide beginning researchers with an understanding of research components such as sampling techniques, measurement issues and statistics. Statistical topics include probability and hypothesis testing.

ED 741 - Applied Research: Leadership Practicum

(Credits: 2.00)

In consultation with the doctoral adviser, the instructors in ED 741, and the community mentor, students will investigate a question or problem, and evaluate the results from a leadership perspective. Drawing on their knowledge base of related leadership and learning theory, students will critique the data from the practicum experience, draw conclusions, and pose further questions for study. Hopefully, this experience will lead the student to the identification of an idea for a dissertation and the subsequent writing of an idea paper that can then be used to begin their dissertation proposal. Statistical topics include probability, hypothesis testing, correlation and prediction. SPSS is used as a computer program to enter data and analyze output.

ED 742 - Research Seminar B

(Credits: 3.00)

This seminar builds upon the research process focus of ED 740 and transitions to a focus on data analysis. It begins with a greater discrimination among different research methodologies, and then focuses on the elements of design that apply to controlled research. Current research studies are used as a springboard to provide students with an understanding of various research methodologies and experimental designs. As students begin working on their dissertation, considerable time is spent working through research process issues. This seminar also builds upon students’ understanding and use of descriptive and inferential statistics, including practical computer applications for research and statistics. Statistical topics include correlation, regression, hypothesis testing, and the z and t tables.

ED 743 - Applied Research: Leading a Learning Organization Practicum

(Credits: 2.00)

The practicum allows students to implement their individualized plan of learning and dissertation work planned in ED 742, Research Seminar B. In consultation with the doctoral adviser, the instructors in ED 743, and the community mentor, students will pursue their individualized practicum plan. The seminar coursework builds on the data analysis focus of ED 742, particularly emphasizing computer applications for research and statistics. Qualitative data analysis is covered in depth in this course. Students will report on the accomplishment of their learning and dissertation goals, including an updated timeline for dissertation completion. Statistical topics include an introduction to non-parametric statistics and analysis of variance.

ED 744 - Research Seminar C

(Credits: 3.00)

The major emphasis of the final year of the research strand is to facilitate the students' completion of the dissertation, help students integrate their knowledge of research with applied scholarship, and help students refine their conceptualization and understanding of research and the research process. This seminar continues to refine students' understanding of the research process, building on the data analysis topics examined in ED 742 and ED 743, and transitioning to a focus on data interpretation. The seminar begins with a more detailed examination of research validity and ethics, and then focuses on valid interpretation and effective reporting of results. As students continue to work on their dissertation, research process issues will be discussed, particularly those applicable to the post-data collection phases of the process. This seminar provides students with a broader view of the research process and their role in that process as leaders and scholars, including practical information on sharing and continuing their research.

ED 745 - Applied Research: Leading a Learning Organization Practicum

(Credits: 2.00)

This practicum involves field application of leading to serve theory and research related to the dissertation proposal. The students will collect and analyze data and initiate the writing of the dissertation. Ultimately, students will present their dissertation study to their Dissertation Committee and to an assembly of their peers.

ED 750 - Leadership in Learning and Service Institute I

(Credits: 6.00)

This course is the first of a three-part current research, theory and practice institute series conducted over the three years of the doctoral program curriculum sequence. Drawing from current theory and research, this course adopts an annual institute format to focus on advanced study of the emerging knowledge base about Leadership in Learning and Service. Topics to be addressed in the continuing institute series include: 1. The nature of Leadership, Learning, and Service; 2. The evolution of Leadership, Learning, and Service theory; 3. The future of Leadership in Learning and Service; 4. Frameworks and practices that empower learning organizations; and 5. Connections to practicum opportunities and personal scholarship interests.

ED 751 - Leadership in Learning and Service Institute II

(Credits: 6.00)

This course is the second of a three-part current research, theory and practice institute series conducted over the three years of the doctoral program curriculum sequence. Drawing from current theory and research, this course adopts an annual institute format to focus on advanced study of the emerging knowledge base about Leadership in Learning and Service. Topics to be addressed in the continuing institute series include: 1. The nature of Leadership, Learning, and Service; 2. The evolution of Leadership, Learning, and Service theory; 3. The future of Leadership in Learning and Service; 4. Frameworks and practices that empower learning organizations; and 5. Connections to practicum opportunities and personal scholarship interests.

ED 752 - Leadership in Learning and Service Institute III

(Credits: 6.00)

This course is the third of a three-part current research, theory and practice institute series conducted over the three years of the doctoral program curriculum sequence. Drawing from current theory and research, this course adopts an annual institute format to focus advanced study of the emerging knowledge base about Leadership in Learning and Service. Topics to be addressed in the continuing institute series include: 1. The nature of Leadership, Learning, and Service; 2. The evolution of Leadership, Learning, and Service theory; 3. The future of Leadership in Learning and Service; 4. Frameworks and practices that empower learning organizations; and 5. Connections to practicum opportunities and personal scholarship interests.

ED 760 - The Superintendency

(Credits: 3.00)

This course explores the skills, knowledge, and dispositions essential to perform effectively as a 21st century school district administrator. Students will analyze and evaluate theories, strategies, and practices embraced by high-performing superintendents, with emphasis placed on the role of district leadership in effectuating change to improve schools and student achievement. The instructor draws upon the background and experiences of superintendency students, as well as current research on change and learning theories, to examine how the superintendent can maximize educational, political, and managerial leadership.

ED 761 - Doctoral Dissertation Seminar

(Credits: None)

This course is a continuation research seminar designed as a requirement for students who have completed all course work and are still working on their dissertation. Enrollment in the course provides students with access to all services provided by the University.

ED 770 - School Finance and Economics

(Credits: 3.00)

This course provides an overview of the Wisconsin School Finance System and provide theoretical and practical knowledge to enable a superintendent to successfully fulfill leadership responsibilities regarding finance and business operations of the school district. The course specifically addresses the following ISLIC Standards:
• Standard 3 – The school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by ensuring management of the organization’s operations and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.
• Standard 4 – The school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by collaborating with family and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.
• Standard 5 – The school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by acting with integrity and fairness, and in an ethical manner.
• Standard 6 – The school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.
• Standards 1 and 2 – “Facilitating Shared Vision” and “Sustaining Culture and Instructional Program” will be indirectly supported through development of leadership competencies addressed in the course.

The emphasis of this course is on the Wisconsin System of School Finance, the Wisconsin School Budgeting Cycle, and business and operations functions of the school district. Attention will be focused on the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary to address school district financial requirements as well as political aspects by creating community understanding and support for the financial operations of the district.

ED 771 - Leadership Development Seminar

(Credits: 1.00)

During this course, students will complete a detailed portfolio that demonstrates knowledge, skills, and dispositions of effective instructional practices based on the Wisconsin Teacher Standards. Students will complete an Administrative Standards Assessment and reflective analysis. Students will create a Personal Leadership Purpose statement, maintain a log of Superintendent-level Practicum Experiences and participate actively in a professional cohort network.

ED 772 - Superintendency Seminar

(Credits: 2.00)

During this course, students will complete a final portfolio that demonstrates knowledge, skills, and dispositions of the Wisconsin Administrative Standards. Students will draft a Professional Development Plan (PDP) based on the requirements of the DPI and PI 34. Students will consider their own progress in leadership development as determined by completing an Administrative Standards Inventory and considering their unique practicum experiences. They will address perceived program/personal professional gaps and address means to close them, participate in development utilization of an online School Leadership Network to advance the cohort's knowledge and skill and to remain connected after course completion. Students will create a Personal Leadership Purpose statement that will be included in their portfolio and develop a working mentor relationship with a superintendent or district-level staff person to advance knowledge, skills, and practice emphasizing those areas of perceived need.

ED 774 - Leadership Perspective of the Nature and Nurture of Learning

(Credits: 2.00)

This course is the companion seminar to ED 776 in the Learning Systems segment of the District Administrator Licensure Program. ED 774 actively engages current research and theory to promote leadership perception of behaviors that favorably influence learning in individuals and organizations. Seminar participants will construct knowledge about the nature and nurture of learning aligned to learning standards and assessments. They will also examine the role of leaders in learning systems and relationships thereof to the Wisconsin Administrator Standards. Prerequisite: Admission to District Administrator Licensure Program.

ED 776 - Leadership in Planning, Facilitating and Assessing Learning

(Credits: 2.00)

ED 776 is the companion seminar to ED 774 in the Learning Systems segment of the District Administrator Licensure program. In this course, students will learn current research and theory to advance leadership perspective of the articulation of learning standards, assessments, and practices in learning systems. Seminar participants will construct knowledge of the nature and alignment of learning, learning standards, and learning assessments. They will also examine the role of leaders in learning systems and relationships thereof to the Wisconsin Administrator Standards.

ED 881 - Writing the Research Narrative

(Credits: 1.00)

This seminar provides direct instruction and coaching in the organization and writing of the research narrative within a doctoral dissertation. Seminar enrollment is appropriate for Ed.D. and Ph.D. candidates engaged in the drafting of dissertation proposals and manuscripts. Seminar participants will: a) refine their understanding of implied questions and content requirements within a research study, b) extend their understanding of APA format, and c) further develop writing skills that support the composition of a clear and coherent research narrative.

ED 882 - Writing the Publication Prospectus

(Credits: 1.00)

This seminar provides direct instruction and coaching in the organization and writing of a prospectus targeting the publication of an article, book, or book chapter related to a research focus. Seminar enrollment is appropriate for Ed.D. or Ph.D. candidates or graduates pursuing the publication of their dissertation research or other research interests. Seminar participants will: a) develop understanding of publishing options and prospectus requirements, b) further develop their skill in narrative writing, and c) complete and submit a publication prospectus to one or more publishers.

ED 888 - Current Issues: Leadership, Learning and Service

(Credits: 1.00 - 3.00)

This course is designed to be an introduction to and discussion about contemporary issues facing professionals and to offer students a complete understanding of the interrelatedness of these components in effective leadership, learning and service. Current issues facing professionals are paramount as institutions are under increasing pressure to demonstrate the effectiveness of their programs and to make themselves more accountable to a variety of internal and external constituencies. The focus will be on developing a plan of action with attention to one specific area of leadership, learning and service. Doctoral students may repeat this course for a maximum of three credits.

EDP 800 - Advanced Research and Theory

(Credits: 2.00)

This advanced course in research methods builds on students’ prior knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research, and focuses on the philosophical foundations of those methods and how they manifest in current research practice. Students will utilize these foundations to examine a variety of important issues that need to be considered in designing research. As the first course in the Ph.D. sequence, this course serves as a transition for doctoral students to prepare them to design and conduct their own research in the Ph.D. track such that their work is positioned to contribute to the current body of research. The course takes students through the Ph.D. proposal writing process, examining the concepts of causality, and focusing on the specific components of the logic needed in chapter one of the dissertation. This course is designed to prepare doctoral students for the transition into doctoral-level scholarship, while emphasizing the logic behind research.

The focus of this course will be on the design and understanding of research through achievement of the following primary learning objectives:
1. Understand and demonstrate original inquiry and analysis, grounded in current knowledge and research that leads to generalizability or transferability;
2. Understand and demonstrate extensive and thorough literature review, analyzing the literature and synthesizing the theoretical foundations and current research;
3. Understand and demonstrate that the literature review includes appropriate primary sources and preponderance of research studies;
4. Understand and demonstrate rigorous design procedures for research including explicit, comprehensive efforts to address internal and external validity, or verification, (i.e. must address causality); and
5. Understand and demonstrate results comprehensively integrated into prior research. Prerequisite: ED 740.

EDP 801 - Survey Research

(Credits: 2.00)

This advanced course in research is one of the elective courses in the Ph.D. sequence. This course prepares doctoral students to design and conduct their own survey. The course takes students through the stages in survey design,including pre-planning, question design, field testing, statistical analysis, and reporting results. The focus of this course is the design and understanding of research through achievement of the following objectives:
1. Understand and demonstrate the importance of pre-planning, including determination of the objectives of the survey, focus on the variables which flow from the research question, linkages of relevant research literature, and use of the knowledge of others to focus on critical ideas.
2. Translate the objectives into a survey which considers the proposed subjects, format, methodology, and analysis plan.
3. Design and field-test the survey to achieve clarity of directions and valid and reliable questions.
4. Understand how to sample a relevant population while minimizing sample error.
5. Understand how to match statistics with the objectives of the study.
6. Understand how to administer, analyze, and report the survey results.

EDP 803 - Case Study Research

(Credits: 1.00)

This seminar actively engages participants in knowledge and skill development related to the what, why, who, how, where, and when of case study research. Seminar content specifically addresses applications of case study to student research interests, including the drafting of research proposals that articulate the alignment of case study design to research purpose. Seminar enrollment is appropriate for both Ed.D. and Ph.D. candidates seeking to extend and refine their knowledge of case study research.

The seminar is focused by knowledge construction related to seven questions:
1. What is case study research?
2. What is case study form?
3. What is case study context?
4. What is case study design?
5. What are data collection sources and techniques in case study research?
6. What are data analysis techniques in case study research?
7. What is case study protocol?

EDP 806 - Grounded Theory Research

(Credits: 1.00)

This seminar is focused by knowledge construction related to three questions 1. What is grounded theory research? 2. What is grounded theory context? 3. What is grounded theory method? The seminar actively engages participants in knowledge construction and skill development related to the what, why, who, how, where and when of grounded theory research. Seminar content is focused by a workshop format that both interprets and applies the defining constant comparative method of grounded theory to student research interests, including the drafting of research proposals that articulate the alignment of grounded theory methodology to research purpose. Seminar enrollment is appropriate for both Ed.D. and Ph.D. candidates seeking to extend and refine their knowledge of grounded theory research.

EDP 810 - Interview Research

(Credits: 1.00)

This seminar actively engages participants in knowledge and skill development related to the what, why, who, how, where and when of interview research. Seminar content specifically addresses applications of interview methodology to their research interests, including the drafting of research design proposals that articulate the alignment of interview research questions, the study's theoretical framework, interview protocols, data collection and analysis techniques to research purpose. Seminar enrollment is appropriate for both the Ed.D. and Ph.D. candidates seeking to extend and refine their knowledge of interview research. The seminar addresses: What is interview research? When is interview research appropriate? How do you conduct interview research? How do you analyze interview data? How do you report results of interview data?

EDP 812 - Focus Group Methodology

(Credits: 1.00)

This advanced course in research methods builds on students’ prior knowledge of quantitative and qualitative methods, the philosophical foundations of those methods and how they manifest in current research practice. Students will utilize these foundations to examine a variety of important issues that need to be considered in designing research. As an elective in the Ph.D. sequence, this course builds knowledge and skill in focus group procedures in the public and non-profit environment. Attention will be placed on that alignment of research purpose to theoretical frameworks and focus group protocols. Questioning routes, moderator skills, planning critical logistical details of focus group interviews, and analyzing results of focus group interviews will be emphasized. Students will design, conduct and analyze a focus group interview related to their research interests.

EDP 814 - Ethnographic Research

(Credits: 1.00)

This course actively engages participants in knowledge construction and skill development related to the what, why, who, how, where and when of ethnographic research. Seminar content specifically addresses applications of ethnography to student research interests, including the drafting of research proposals that articulate the alignment of ethnographic design to research purpose. Seminar enrollment is appropriate for both Ed.D. and Ph.D. candidates seeking to extend and refine their knowledge of ethnographic research. The seminar is focused by knowledge construction related to six questions: 1) What is ethnographic research? 2) What is ethnographic research form? 3) What is ethnographic research context? 4) What is ethnographic research design? 5) What are data collection sources and techniques in ethnographic research? 6) What are data analysis techniques in ethnographic research?

EDP 816 - Biographical Research

(Credits: 1.00)

This course actively engages participants in knowledge construction and skill development related to the what, why, who, how, where and when of biographical research. Seminar content specifically addresses applications of biography to student research interests, including the drafting of research proposals that articulate the alignment of biographical design to research purpose. Seminar enrollment is appropriate for both Ed.D. and Ph.D. candidates seeking to extend, and refine, their knowledge of biographical research.

EDP 821 - Historical Research

(Credits: 1.00)

This course focuses on helping students understand the advanced elements of historical research. The main areas of focus are researching, evaluating, interpreting, and utilizing primary and secondary sources; use of bibliographical tools; and the employment of social science methodologies for historical research, including qualitative, quantitative, and electronic models. The emphasis is on developing both writing and research skills to be incorporated into the dissertation. Students will use their own dissertation questions to apply them to the objectives and exercises outlined. The seminar requires attention to detail, but allows students a break from the more traditional thematic structure of seminars. A significant portion of the seminar is dedicated to learning how to take advantage of electronic resources and research techniques.

EDP 822 - Program Evaluation

(Credits: 1.00)

This course is designed to examine and understand the basic and advanced components of the research methodology of program evaluation. Program evaluation is carefully collecting information about a program, or some aspect of a program, in order to make necessary decisions and analysis. Program evaluation can include a variety of different types of evaluation, such as needs assessments, accreditation, cost/benefit analysis, effectiveness, efficiency, formative, summative, goal-based, process, outcomes and more. This course examines the basic components of program evaluation, the different types of program evaluation, theoretical framework, and practical uses of program evaluation.

EDP 847 - Observational Research

(Credits: 1.00)

This course is designed to involve students in observational research, which includes watching people in their natural settings engaging in everyday activities. Participants work together to systematically collect and analyze data to enhance interpretation and validity of observation.

EDP 848 - Observational Research: International Practicum

(Credits: 1.00 - 2.00)

This course is designed for current and past doctoral-level students to broaden perspectives through an immersion experience in the Umbrian and Franciscan cultures. It is conducted at the Pieve International School in Corciano, Italy, and surrounding towns (i.e. Assisi, Perugia, etc.) offering participants multiple opportunities to examine their leadership; conduct observational research; learn from and engage in dialogue with Italian leaders and one another; and think deeply about serving at multiple levels. The schedule includes visits to Franciscan sites, areas of reflection, and sustainable organizations, and meetings with prominent Italian spiritual, business, educational, service-oriented, and non-profit leaders to discuss ideas and perspectives, and consider potential partnerships around global issues. Students will collect, analyze and report data incorporating a synthesis of "lived" experiences, which include insights from literature and theory, observations, dialogue, reflections, and comparisons and contrasts across cultures related to leadership and service. Findings are intended to improve ways to facilitate personal, organizational and/or societal change.

EDP 850 - Advanced Statistics I

(Credits: 1.00)

This advanced course in statistics builds on students' prior knowledge of and experience with data analysis techniques. Specifically, this course assumes that students have a basic understanding and working knowledge of foundational statistical concepts such as descriptive versus inferential statistics; the unit normal distribution; students t-distribution; the F distribution; measures of central tendency and dispersion; correlation and prediction; basics of hypothesis testing; specific techniques for testing inferences about single means, pairs of mean (i.e. t-tests for single means, independent and dependent pairs of means), three or more means (i.e. one-way ANOVA). This course is designed to provide students with data analysis techniques for more complex research designs commonly associated with quantitative dissertations.

EDP 851 - Advanced Statistics II

(Credits: 1.00)

This advanced course in statistics builds on students’ prior knowledge of and experience with data analysis techniques presented in EDP 850 Advanced Statistics I, as well as basic statistics concepts. Specifically, this course assumes that students have a basic understanding and working knowledge of foundational and advanced statistical concepts. This course is designed to provide students with data analysis techniques employed in the latest and more advanced research endeavors in the social sciences and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: EDP 800, EDP 850.

EDP 852 - Qualitative Data Analysis with NVivo

(Credits: 1.00)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills coding and analyzing qualitative data using NVivo9, a qualitative analysis software package. Seminar content will specifically address applications of data analysis as it relates to student research data – including the drafting of a paper that articulates the alignment of data collection and NVivo analysis to the research purpose. Additionally, course readings and discussions will encourage students’ thinking as they develop epistemic perspective. Seminar enrollment is appropriate for students who have collected their data (field notes, transcribed interviews, meeting agendas, etc.) or if data collection has not occurred, student must have a completed literature review to use as the material for the seminar.

EDP 880 - Literature Review

(Credits: 1.00)

This course is designed to help students construct a literature review that reflects the ability to: organize large quantities of scholarly information, perform critical analysis of scholarly literature, and use literature in the development and understanding of theoretical frameworks. An understanding of frameworks within literature allows readers to explain what it means and articulate an interpretation which shows how the theory may be used to create meaning, guide research and inform practice.

EDP 890 - Current Research Theory

(Credits: 1.00)

This course is designed to extend into the classroom the knowledge gained at the Summer Institute at Cardinal Stritch University. Course participants attend the doctoral Summer Institute, learning from nationally recognized experts, including Stritch faculty, in the field of leadership, learning, and service. Students will be required to complete research on aspects of current theory, integrating the information from the Summer Institute and relating it to practical aspects within society. It is intended to engage the doctoral student in higher order evaluation, analysis and synthesis of the theoretical constructs to inform dissertation content, process and product, with an emphasis on research. Because of the nature of this course, students may repeat the class more than once. Prerequisite: Students must have completed all doctoral (Ed.D.) coursework prior to enrolling in EDP 890..

EDP 899 - Advanced Theory and Models

(Credits: 2.00)

This is a Ph.D. capstone course that focuses on the nature and processes of theory development and model building, drawing from epistemology and the philosophy of research. Major issues in the development of theory, model building, and knowledge are examined, with emphasis on the analysis of social phenomena. This course acquaints participants with some of the key theoretical issues of social science research, as well as the basic processes of theory formulation. Learners will become familiar with supervision/leadership and organization theories and models as well as major trends and issues in the study of educational organizations. How leadership/supervision theory, change processes, and decision-making impact organizations and individuals are explored. Learners will critically assess, then apply the theories to their own experiences and develop a theoretical perspective which will be used to enhance chapter five of their own dissertation. This is the final course of the Ph.D. sequence.